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    Author(s): Richard A. Sniezko; Angelia Kegley
    Date: 2018
    Source: In: Schoettle, Anna W.; Sniezko, Richard A.; Kliejunas, John T., eds. Proceedings of the IUFRO joint conference: Genetics of five-needle pines, rusts of forest trees, and Strobusphere; 2014 June 15-20; Fort Collins, CO. Proc. RMRS-P-76. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 168-169.
    Publication Series: Proceedings (P)
    Station: Rocky Mountain Research Station
    PDF: Download Publication  (206.0 KB)

    Description

    The nine native species of white pines in the United States (four of which also occur in Canada) are all highly susceptible to white pine blister rust caused by the fungal pathogen Cronartium ribicola. Research and applied programs in the United States and Canada to develop resistant populations of white pine species have been underway for more than 50 years. The regional program based at the U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service’s Dorena Genetic Resource Center (DGRC; Cottage Grove, Oregon, USA) has the most experience and continuity and has been active for over 50 years. The DGRC has evaluated rust resistance in families of eight of the nine species of white pines that are native to the United States, for an array of resistance responses in seedling inoculation trials (and seedlings for the remaining species, foxtail pine [Pinus balfournia], are slated for inoculation in fall 2015). Inoculations of seedlings of more than 10,000 families have been completed over this time. A subset of these families has been tested several times in different years or with different geographic sources of rust and differing inoculum densities, or a combination thereof. Another subset of these families - western white pine (P. monticola), sugar pine (P. lambertiana), and whitebark pine (P. albicaulis) - has been used to established field trials to validate the results of seedling screening and to monitor the durability of the different types of resistance (Sniezko et al. 2012). The extensive experience gained through this large series of trials has helped refine the understanding of the types of resistance and their frequencies (Kegley and Sniezko 2004; Sniezko et al. 2008, 2011, 2012, 2014). These screening trials have focused on both major gene resistance (present in four of the species; see Schoettle et al. 2014) and other types of resistance apparent in the 5 years of observations following each artificial inoculation (Kegley and Sniezko 2004; Sniezko et al. 2011, 2012, 2014).

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    Citation

    Sniezko, Richard A.; Kegley, Angelia. 2018. The definitive guide for white pine blister rust resistance in white pine species of western North America (beta 2014.0 version) - a tree breeder’s perspective. In: Schoettle, Anna W.; Sniezko, Richard A.; Kliejunas, John T., eds. Proceedings of the IUFRO joint conference: Genetics of five-needle pines, rusts of forest trees, and Strobusphere; 2014 June 15-20; Fort Collins, CO. Proc. RMRS-P-76. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 168-169.

    Keywords

    genetic variation, genetic conservation, restoration, Pinus, Populus, rust fungi, disease resistance, climate change, Cronartium ribicola

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https://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/pubs/56731