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    Author(s): Harv Koester; Douglas P. Savin; Matt Buss; Richard A. Sniezko
    Date: 2018
    Source: In: Schoettle, Anna W.; Sniezko, Richard A.; Kliejunas, John T., eds. Proceedings of the IUFRO joint conference: Genetics of five-needle pines, rusts of forest trees, and Strobusphere; 2014 June 15-20; Fort Collins, CO. Proc. RMRS-P-76. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 173-180.
    Publication Series: Proceedings (P)
    Station: Rocky Mountain Research Station
    PDF: View PDF  (1.0 MB)

    Description

    Sugar pine (Pinus lambertiana) and western white pine (Pinus monticola) are two important long-lived conifer species in forests of southwestern Oregon (USA) and elsewhere. Both of these white pine species have been in decline for decades due largely to the presence of the nonnative white pine blister rust, caused by the fungal pathogen Cronartium ribicola. Many land managers are interested in keeping these white pine species present in forest ecosystems or in managed forests, but the very high susceptibility of these species to the blister rust and the lack of information rating the landscape for rust hazard have prevented their full use. This study provides an overview of the rust infection levels at 265 sites in southwestern Oregon during the 1980s, including the frequency of cankered trees at each site and maps showing the geographic distribution patterns of the differing levels of infection. This information will assist land managers in plans for deploying seed from the blister rust resistance programs. All except one site had infected white pine species, and the mean percentage of trees with cankers over the 265 sites was 43.9 percent, with the average number of cankers per tree ranging from 0 to >11 per site. The mapping of the levels of infection showed some areas of notable low and high infection. Cankers tended to be within 2.4 m of the ground, suggesting that early branch pruning of planted trees might increase survival. This extensive one-time survey of sites is valuable in helping delineate areas of lowest and highest infection levels, but other data suggest that such surveys may underestimate the level of infection and should be complemented by a subset of permanent plots. With the widespread presence and impact of the rust, the continued development and use of genetically resistant sugar pine and western white pine seed will be vital in retaining or restoring these species to desirable levels in southwestern Oregon.

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    Citation

    Koester, Harv; Savin, Douglas P.; Buss, Matt; Sniezko, Richard A. 2018. White pine blister rust hazard rating for 265 sites in southern Oregon, USA. In: Schoettle, Anna W.; Sniezko, Richard A.; Kliejunas, John T., eds. Proceedings of the IUFRO joint conference: Genetics of five-needle pines, rusts of forest trees, and Strobusphere; 2014 June 15-20; Fort Collins, CO. Proc. RMRS-P-76. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 173-180.

    Keywords

    genetic variation, genetic conservation, restoration, Pinus, Populus, rust fungi, disease resistance, climate change, Cronartium ribicola

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https://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/pubs/56733