Skip to Main Content
U.S. Forest Service
Caring for the land and serving people

United States Department of Agriculture

Home > Search > Publication Information

  1. Share via EmailShare on FacebookShare on LinkedInShare on Twitter
    Dislike this pubLike this pub
    Author(s): Anna SchoettleBetsy Goodrich; Jen Klutsch; Kelly Burns
    Date: 2018
    Source: In: Schoettle, Anna W.; Sniezko, Richard A.; Kliejunas, John T., eds. Proceedings of the IUFRO joint conference: Genetics of five-needle pines, rusts of forest trees, and Strobusphere; 2014 June 15-20; Fort Collins, CO. Proc. RMRS-P-76. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 201-204.
    Publication Series: Proceedings (P)
    Station: Rocky Mountain Research Station
    PDF: View PDF  (2.0 MB)

    Description

    On August 24, 2009, while working in Rocky Mountain National Park (Estes Park, Colorado, USA) on the Conserving Limber Pine Genetic Diversity for Possible Future Restoration at Rocky Mountain National Park project (see Schoettle et al. 2011, 2013, in press), a crew from the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station (RMRS) noticed a small limber pine (Pinus flexilis) with a dead top along Highway 36 near the Many Parks Curve (fig. 1). The tree was about 2 m tall and 7 to 10 cm in diameter at breast height (d.b.h., 1.37 m) and occurred at about 3,000 m in elevation. The UTM coordinates for the tree are E445370, N4471762 (WGS84, Z13N). The signs on the main stem were consistent with symptoms caused by the canker fungus Cronartium ribicola, which causes white pine blister rust (WPBR). Mature trees and seedlings in the area around the infected tree were surveyed on September 11, 2009. One branch in the upper crown of a mature tree at 3,020 m in elevation resembled WPBR because of the extensive chewing by squirrels (Family Sciuridae). The tree was flagged and its UTM coordinates are E445230, N4471698 (WGS84, Z13N). No other suspected cankers were found. Similar surveys of mature and young trees were conducted at each of 17 research sites within the eastern side of the park and no other suspected WPBR infections were observed. Ribes inerme, a susceptible alternate host for C. ribicola, is present along Hidden Valley Creek in the Beaver Ponds area, suggesting that this area could serve as a source of basidiospores to infect limber pine up slope if the rust were present in the area. No evidence of rust infection of the Ribes plants in the Beaver Ponds area was seen during a 2009 inspection.

    Publication Notes

    • You may send email to rmrspubrequest@fs.fed.us to request a hard copy of this publication.
    • (Please specify exactly which publication you are requesting and your mailing address.)
    • We recommend that you also print this page and attach it to the printout of the article, to retain the full citation information.
    • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.

    Citation

    Schoettle, Anna; Goodrich, Betsy; Klutsch, Jen; Burns, Kelly. 2018. White pine blister rust confirmed on limber pine (Pinus flexilis) in Rocky Mountain National Park. In: Schoettle, Anna W.; Sniezko, Richard A.; Kliejunas, John T., eds. Proceedings of the IUFRO joint conference: Genetics of five-needle pines, rusts of forest trees, and Strobusphere; 2014 June 15-20; Fort Collins, CO. Proc. RMRS-P-76. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 201-204.

    Keywords

    genetic variation, genetic conservation, restoration, Pinus, Populus, rust fungi, disease resistance, climate change, Cronartium ribicola

    Related Search


    XML: View XML
Show More
Show Fewer
Jump to Top of Page
https://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/pubs/56736