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    Author(s): I. A. Munck; P. Tanguay; J. Weimer; K. Lombard; S. Villani; K. Cox
    Date: 2018
    Source: In: Schoettle, Anna W.; Sniezko, Richard A.; Kliejunas, John T., eds. Proceedings of the IUFRO joint conference: Genetics of five-needle pines, rusts of forest trees, and Strobusphere; 2014 June 15-20; Fort Collins, CO. Proc. RMRS-P-76. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 214.
    Publication Series: Proceedings (P)
    Station: Rocky Mountain Research Station
    PDF: Download Publication  (224.0 KB)

    Description

    White pine blister rust (WPBR; causal agent: Cronartium ribicola) has been a threat to both forest resources and agricultural commodities since its introduction to North America in the early 1900s. Eastern white pine (Pinus strobus) is the most economically important timber species in New Hampshire (USA). From 1917 to 1970 Ribes throughout the State was eradicated to protect the timber industry. After the lifting of the Federal Quarantine Act (USDA Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine Federal Domestic Plant Quarantine number 63 [1938]) restricting Ribes and the more recent availability of immune and resistant Ribes cultivars, several States in the Northeast amended their restrictions to allow planting of selected Ribes cultivars. In New Hampshire, 19 WPBR-resistant or immune Ribes cultivars were available for planting. In 2011, WPBR was reported for the first time on immune black currant (Ribes nigrum cv. Titania) in Connecticut. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the impact of WPBR on cultivated resistant and immune Ribes cultivars and neighboring white pines.

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    Citation

    Munck, I. A.; Tanguay, P.; Weimer, J.; Lombard, K.; Villani, S.; Cox, K. 2018. Impact of white pine blister rust on resistant and previously immune cultivated Ribes and neighboring eastern white pine (Pinus strobus) in New Hampshire, USA. In: Schoettle, Anna W.; Sniezko, Richard A.; Kliejunas, John T., eds. Proceedings of the IUFRO joint conference: Genetics of five-needle pines, rusts of forest trees, and Strobusphere; 2014 June 15-20; Fort Collins, CO. Proc. RMRS-P-76. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 214.

    Keywords

    genetic variation, genetic conservation, restoration, Pinus, Populus, rust fungi, disease resistance, climate change, Cronartium ribicola

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https://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/pubs/56739