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    Author(s): J.-J Liu; A. Zamany; R. A. Sturrock; R. Hunt; R. A. Sniezko
    Date: 2018
    Source: In: Schoettle, Anna W.; Sniezko, Richard A.; Kliejunas, John T., eds. Proceedings of the IUFRO joint conference: Genetics of five-needle pines, rusts of forest trees, and Strobusphere; 2014 June 15-20; Fort Collins, CO. Proc. RMRS-P-76. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 227.
    Publication Series: Proceedings (P)
    Station: Rocky Mountain Research Station
    PDF: View PDF  (225.0 KB)

    Description

    In North America, the nonnative rust fungus Cronartium ribicola kills immature native five-needle pine trees and indirectly predisposes maturing trees to secondary attack by insects and other fungi, which may result in severe mortality. Since the early 1900s when C. ribicola arrived, environmental factors, individual trees, the rust fungus, and insects (for example, mountain pine beetle [Dendroctonus ponderosae]) have all interacted to dramatically change forested ecosystems across North America. To date our white pine blister rust (WPBR) research has generated genomics data from the WPBR ecosystem, including transcriptomes and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from healthy western white pines (WWPs, Pinus monticola), whitebark pines (WBPs, P. albicaulis), and infected white pines (down to 60 percent of transcripts from tree tissues, up to 40 percent of transcripts from C. ribicola), and from C. ribicola strains at different stages of its life cycle by RNA-sequencing technology.

    Publication Notes

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    Citation

    Liu, J.-J.; Zamany, A.; Sturrock, R. A.; Hunt, R.; Sniezko, R. A. 2018. Discovery of mycovirus community in the white pine blister rust ecosystems by rust transcriptome profiling. In: Schoettle, Anna W.; Sniezko, Richard A.; Kliejunas, John T., eds. Proceedings of the IUFRO joint conference: Genetics of five-needle pines, rusts of forest trees, and Strobusphere; 2014 June 15-20; Fort Collins, CO. Proc. RMRS-P-76. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 227.

    Keywords

    genetic variation, genetic conservation, restoration, Pinus, Populus, rust fungi, disease resistance, climate change, Cronartium ribicola

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https://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/pubs/56744