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    Description

    Propagule size and number often vary by several orders of magnitude among co-occurring plant species. Explaining the maintenance of this variation and understanding how propagule size contributes to coexistence remain a central challenge for community ecologists. The dominant paradigm is that a competition-colonization trade‐off maintains interspecific variation in seed size, but empirical support is limited and other coexistence mechanisms, such as size‐dependent seed predation, have not been examined.

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    Citation

    Maron, John L.; Hajek, Karyn L.; Hahn, Philip G.; Pearson, Dean E. 2018. Rodent seed predators and a dominant grass competitor affect coexistence of co-occurring forb species that vary in seed size. Journal of Ecology. 106: 1795-1805.

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    Keywords

    coexistence, community assembly, Festuca campestris, functional traits, Peromyscus manipulates, seed predation, seed size, trade‐offs

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https://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/pubs/57024