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    Author(s): Keith G. Tidball; Marianne E. Krasny; Elon D. Weinstein
    Date: 2019
    Source: In: Campbell, Lindsay K.; Svendsen, Erika; Sonti, Nancy Falxa; Hines, Sarah J.; Maddox, David, eds. Green readiness, response, and recovery: A collaborative synthesis. Gen. Tech. Rep. NRS-P-185.
    Publication Series: Paper (invited, offered, keynote)
    Station: Northern Research Station
    PDF: Download Publication  (168.0 KB)

    Description

    In "Greening in the Red Zone: Disaster, Resilience, and Community Greening," Tidball and Krasny (2014a) make the case that creation of and access to green spaces promotes individual human health and community healing, especially in therapeutic contexts among those suffering traumatic events, asserting that making and being in green spaces confers resilience and recovery in social-ecological systems disrupted by violent conflict or disaster. To make this case, and to understand the broader implications of humans turning to nature in times of disaster or crisis, the authors proposed working definitions of greening and red zones, as well as a conceptual or explanatory framework. Such a framework describes the relationships between the act of greening and other components of the social-ecological system in which these actions are nested. The "Greening in the Red Zone" approach leverages the notion of resilience, which offers a strong foundation for understanding the role of greening following disaster and conflict at multiple, interrelated levels—individual, social, and ecosystem. In brief, greening refers to the activities of humans, working alone or more commonly with others in their community, to restore local social-ecological systems through such activities as community gardening, community forestry, and improving habitat for wildlife and aquatic biodiversity (Tidball and Krasny 2014b). The term "red zone" refers to multiple settings (spatial and temporal) that may be characterized as intense, potentially or recently hostile or dangerous areas or times, including those in post-disaster situations caused by natural disasters such as hurricanes and earthquakes, as well as those associated with terrorist attacks and war (Tidball and Krasny 2014b).

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    Citation

    Tidball, Keith G.; Krasny, Marianne E.; Weinstein, Elon D. 2019. Response, recovery and greening in the red zone: Lessons for policy and practice. In: Campbell, Lindsay K.; Svendsen, Erika; Sonti, Nancy Falxa; Hines, Sarah J.; Maddox, David, eds. Green readiness, response, and recovery: A collaborative synthesis. Gen. Tech. Rep. NRS-P-185. Newtown Square, PA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service: 24-43. https://doi.org/10.2737/NRS-GTR-P-185-paper2.

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