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How arts and cultural strategies can accelerate environmental progress

Author(s):

Jamie Hand
Alexis Frasz

Year:

2019

Publication type:

Paper (invited, offered, keynote)

Primary Station(s):

Northern Research Station

Source:

In: Campbell, Lindsay K.; Svendsen, Erika; Sonti, Nancy Falxa; Hines, Sarah J.; Maddox, David, eds. Green readiness, response, and recovery: A collaborative synthesis. Gen. Tech. Rep. NRS-P-185. Newtown Square, PA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service: 306-323.

Description

ArtPlace America (ArtPlace) is a 10-year consortium of a number of foundations, federal agencies, and financial institutions that works to position arts and culture as a core sector of comprehensive community planning and development. We do this work to help strengthen the social, physical, and economic fabric of communities. ArtPlace’s efforts are largely focused around "creative placemaking," which describes projects in which art plays an intentional and integrated role in place-based community planning and development. This brings artists, arts organizations, and artistic activity into the suite of placemaking strategies pioneered by Jane Jacobs and her colleagues, who believed that community development must be locally informed, human-centric, and holistic (Jacobs 1961). In practice, this means having arts and culture represented alongside sectors like housing, transportation, public safety, and others—with each sector recognized as part of any healthy community; as requiring planning and investment from its community; and as having a responsibility to contribute to its community's overall future.

Citation

Hand, Jamie; Frasz, Alexis. 2019. How arts and cultural strategies can accelerate environmental progress. In: Campbell, Lindsay K.; Svendsen, Erika; Sonti, Nancy Falxa; Hines, Sarah J.; Maddox, David, eds. Green readiness, response, and recovery: A collaborative synthesis. Gen. Tech. Rep. NRS-P-185. Newtown Square, PA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service: 306-323. https://doi.org/10.2737/NRS-GTR-P-185-paper21.

Cited

Publication Notes

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  • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.
https://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/pubs/58001