Skip to Main Content
U.S. Forest Service
Caring for the land and serving people

United States Department of Agriculture

Home > Search > Publication Information

  1. Share via EmailShare on FacebookShare on LinkedInShare on Twitter
    Dislike this pubLike this pub
    Author(s): Jeanne C. Chambers; Karen L. Prentice; Michele R. Crist
    Date: 2019
    Source: In: Crist, Michele R.; Chambers, Jeanne C.; Phillips, Susan L.; Prentice, Karen L.; Wiechman, Lief A., eds. Science framework for conservation and restoration of the sagebrush biome: Linking the Department of the Interior’s Integrated Rangeland Fire Management Strategy to long-term strategic conservation actions. Part 2. Management applications. Gen. Tech. Rep. RMRS-GTR-389. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 1-18.
    Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)
    Station: Rocky Mountain Research Station
    PDF: Download Publication  (1.0 MB)

    Description

    The Science Framework is part of an unprecedented conservation effort underway across 11 States in the western United States to address threats to sagebrush (Artemisia spp.) ecosystems and the species that depend on them. Sagebrush ecosystems provide a large diversity of habitats and support more than 350 species of vertebrates (Suring et al. 2005). These ecosystems currently make up only about 59 percent of their historical area, and the primary patterns, processes, and components of many sagebrush ecosystems have been significantly altered since Euro-American settlement in the mid-1800s (Knick et al. 2011; Miller et al. 2011). The primary threats to sagebrush ecosystems are well recognized and include large-scale wildfire, invasion of exotic annual grasses, conifer expansion, energy development, conversion to cropland, and urban and exurban development (Coates et al. 2016; Davies et al. 2011; Knick et al. 2011; USDOI FWS 2013). The continued loss and fragmentation of sagebrush habitats has placed many species at risk, including Greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus; hereafter, GRSG), which has been considered for listing under the Endangered Species Act several times (USDOI FWS 2010, 2015) and whose status will be reevaluated in 2020 (USDOI FWS 2015).

    Publication Notes

    • You may send email to rmrspubrequest@fs.fed.us to request a hard copy of this publication.
    • (Please specify exactly which publication you are requesting and your mailing address.)
    • We recommend that you also print this page and attach it to the printout of the article, to retain the full citation information.
    • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.

    Citation

    Chambers, Jeanne C.; Prentice, Karen L.; Crist, Michele R. 2019. Overview of the Science Framework [Chapter 1]. In: Crist, Michele R.; Chambers, Jeanne C.; Phillips, Susan L.; Prentice, Karen L.; Wiechman, Lief A., eds. Science framework for conservation and restoration of the sagebrush biome: Linking the Department of the Interior’s Integrated Rangeland Fire Management Strategy to long-term strategic conservation actions. Part 2. Management applications. Gen. Tech. Rep. RMRS-GTR-389. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 1-18.

    Keywords

    sagebrush habitat, Greater sage-grouse, resilience, resistance, conservation, restoration, monitoring, adaptive management, climate adaptation, wildfire, nonnative invasive plants, National Seed Strategy, livestock grazing, wild horses and burros

    Related Search


    XML: View XML
Show More
Show Fewer
Jump to Top of Page
https://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/pubs/58384