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    Author(s): Michele R. Crist; Jeanne C. Chambers; Jonathon A. Skinner
    Date: 2019
    Source: In: Crist, Michele R.; Chambers, Jeanne C.; Phillips, Susan L.; Prentice, Karen L.; Wiechman, Lief A., eds. Science framework for conservation and restoration of the sagebrush biome: Linking the Department of the Interior’s Integrated Rangeland Fire Management Strategy to long-term strategic conservation actions. Part 2. Management applications. Gen. Tech. Rep. RMRS-GTR-389. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 63-88.
    Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)
    Station: Rocky Mountain Research Station
    PDF: Download Publication  (2.0 MB)

    Description

    Wildland fire has always been an important ecosystem process across the sagebrush biome. Recently, the scale of sagebrush ecosystem loss and fragmentation has increased due to a combination of uncharacteristic wildland fire, invasive annual grasses, juniper (Juniperus spp.) and piñon (Pinus spp.) expansion, and anthropogenic land use and development. A strategic approach to wildland fire and vegetation management is now required that focuses available resources in the places that will maximize conservation return on investment. Wildland fire management integrated with vegetation management (fuel reduction and ecosystem restoration) has the potential to increase that return on investment by enhancing the resilience of native sagebrush ecosystems to stress and disturbance and resistance to invasive annual grasses. Similarly, vegetation management along with postfire restoration helps maintain functionally diverse plant communities with the capacity to persist and stabilize ecosystem processes under altered disturbance regimes. When placed in the context of large landscapes, these actions collectively are part of a strategy to maintain the necessary ecosystem processes and connectivity that allow ecosystems and species to adapt to increasing pressure from anthropogenic land use and development and fluctuations in climate.

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    Citation

    Crist, Michele R.; Chambers, Jeanne C.; Skinner, Jonathon A. 2019. Wildland fire and vegetation management [Chapter 4]. In: Crist, Michele R.; Chambers, Jeanne C.; Phillips, Susan L.; Prentice, Karen L.; Wiechman, Lief A., eds. Science framework for conservation and restoration of the sagebrush biome: Linking the Department of the Interior’s Integrated Rangeland Fire Management Strategy to long-term strategic conservation actions. Part 2. Management applications. Gen. Tech. Rep. RMRS-GTR-389. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 63-88.

    Keywords

    sagebrush habitat, Greater sage-grouse, resilience, resistance, conservation, restoration, monitoring, adaptive management, climate adaptation, wildfire, nonnative invasive plants, National Seed Strategy, livestock grazing, wild horses and burros

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