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    Author(s): Fred Edwards; Sarah M. Kulpa; Francis F. Kilkenny
    Date: 2019
    Source: In: Crist, Michele R.; Chambers, Jeanne C.; Phillips, Susan L.; Prentice, Karen L.; Wiechman, Lief A., eds. Science framework for conservation and restoration of the sagebrush biome: Linking the Department of the Interior’s Integrated Rangeland Fire Management Strategy to long-term strategic conservation actions. Part 2. Management applications. Gen. Tech. Rep. RMRS-GTR-389. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 113-130.
    Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)
    Station: Rocky Mountain Research Station
    PDF: Download Publication  (1.0 MB)

    Description

    Native plant species are the foundation of sagebrush ecosystems and provide essential habitat for wildlife species, such as Greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus; hereafter, GRSG). The National Seed Strategy for Rehabilitation and Restoration (hereafter, Seed Strategy) (PCA 2015) strives to provide all land managers - Federal, tribal, State, county, private, and nongovernmental organization - the tools they need to address ecological restoration across the United States. The Seed Strategy provides a coordinated approach to improving the use of native seed, building Federal and private capacity, and increasing the supply of genetically appropriate native seed (PCA 2015). The Seed Strategy recognizes the value of existing native plants and soil seedbanks and acknowledges that not all disturbances or management treatments require active seeding to restore habitat. The Seed Strategy also recognizes that although many nonnative species have been seeded successfully and economically to provide forage and soil stabilization, their ability to support diversity and provide functioning ecosystems to meet multiple use and sustained yield mandates is limited (PCA 2015). Successful rehabilitation and restoration must always take into consideration compatibility of species in a seed mix, planting season, and appropriate seeding rates, techniques, technologies, and practices; that information is available elsewhere (e.g., Madsen et al. 2012, 2014; Monsen et al. 2004a,b,c; Ott et al. 2016; Pyke et al. 2015a,b, 2017).

    Publication Notes

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    Citation

    Edwards, Fred; Kulpa, Sarah M.; Kilkenny, Francis F. 2019. Application of national seed strategy concepts [Chapter 6]. In: Crist, Michele R.; Chambers, Jeanne C.; Phillips, Susan L.; Prentice, Karen L.; Wiechman, Lief A., eds. Science framework for conservation and restoration of the sagebrush biome: Linking the Department of the Interior’s Integrated Rangeland Fire Management Strategy to long-term strategic conservation actions. Part 2. Management applications. Gen. Tech. Rep. RMRS-GTR-389. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 113-130.

    Keywords

    sagebrush habitat, Greater sage-grouse, resilience, resistance, conservation, restoration, monitoring, adaptive management, climate adaptation, wildfire, nonnative invasive plants, National Seed Strategy, livestock grazing, wild horses and burros

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