Skip to Main Content
U.S. Forest Service
Caring for the land and serving people

United States Department of Agriculture

Home > Search > Publication Information

  1. Share via EmailShare on FacebookShare on LinkedInShare on Twitter
    Dislike this pubLike this pub
    Author(s): Margarete Watzka; Ernesto Medina
    Date: 2018
    Source: In J. C. García Cañedo and G. L. López Lizárraga (eds.). Photosynthesis – from its evolution to future improvements in photosynthetic efficiency using nanomaterials (pp. 69-91). Intech.
    Publication Series: Book Chapter
    Station: International Institute of Tropical Forestry
    PDF: Download Publication  (6.0 MB)

    Description

    Mangrove trees of the salt secreting Avicennia germinans and the non-secreting Rhizophora mangle were investigated at the northern coast of Venezuela at a low salinity site (127 mmol kg−1) and two hypersaline sites (1600–1800 mmol kg−1). Leaf sap osmolality and mass/ area ratio of both species were positively correlated, while size was negatively correlated with soil salinity. Leaf sap osmolality was always higher in Avicennia and exceeded soil solution osmolality. Salinity increased the concentration of 1D-1-O-methyl-muco-inositol (OMMI) in Rhizophora and glycinebetaine in Avicennia. The latter could make up to 21% of total leaf nitrogen (N). Nitrogen concentration was higher in Avicennia, but subtracting the N bound in glycinebetaine eliminated interspecific differences. Photosynthetic rates were higher in Avicennia, and they decreased with salinity in both species. Leaf conductance (gl ) and light saturated photosynthesis (Asat) were highly correlated, but reduction of gl at the hypersaline sites was more pronounced than Asat increasing water use efficiency in both species. Lower values of 13C discrimination at the hypersaline sites evidenced higher long-term water use efficiency. Apparent quantum yield and carboxylation efficiency decreased with salinity in both species. Rhizophora was more sensitive to high salinity than Avicennia, suggesting that glycinebetaine is a better osmoprotectant than OMMI.

    Publication Notes

    • We recommend that you also print this page and attach it to the printout of the article, to retain the full citation information.
    • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.

    Citation

    Watzka, Margarete; Medina, Ernesto. 2018. Chapter 6: Mangroves in contrasting osmotic environments: photosynthetic costs of high salinity tolerance. In J. C. García Cañedo and G. L. López Lizárraga (eds.). Photosynthesis – from its evolution to future improvements in photosynthetic efficiency using nanomaterials (pp. 69-91). Intech. Doi:10.5772/intechopen.74750

    Cited

    Google Scholar

    Keywords

    Mangroves, Avicennia germinans, Rhizophora mangle.

    Related Search


    XML: View XML
Show More
Show Fewer
Jump to Top of Page
https://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/pubs/58768