Skip to main content
U.S. flag

An official website of the United States government

Development of tools for early detection, monitoring and management of the koa wilt pathogen (Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. koae) in Hawaiíi

Author(s):

John T. Dobbs
Nicklos S. Dudley
Tyler C. Jones
Phil G. Cannon
Robert D. Hauff
Jane E. Stewart

Year:

2019

Publication type:

Scientific Journal (JRNL)

Primary Station(s):

Rocky Mountain Research Station

Historical Station(s):

Pacific Northwest Research Station

Source:

In: Cleaver, C.; Palacious, P., compilers. Proceedings of the 65th annual Western International Forest Disease Work Conference; 2-6 October 2017; Parksville, BC, Canada. WIFDWC. p. 105-108.

Description

Koa (Acacia koa Gray) is an endemic, keystone species in Hawai’i’s forests. Koa is valuable economically (contributed $30 million to Hawai’i’s forestry industry in 2001), ecologically (habitat for many endangered birds and insects), and culturally (koa is the main wood used for making Hawaiian canoes). Mortality of koa trees due to koa wilt (caused by Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. koae; Foxy-koae) has been increasing, primarily in the low- to mid-elevation forests (Gardner 1980). Fusarium oxysporum (Foxy) is an important vascular wilt pathogen of many plant species worldwide (Leslie 2006). Foxy is highly variable and can be pathogenic or saprophytic without discernable, morphological differences. The origin of Foxy-koae strains that are virulent to koa in Hawaii is currently unknown.

Citation

Dobbs, John T.; Kim, Mee-Sook; Dudley, Nicklos S.; Jones, Tyler C.; Dumroese, R. Kasten; Cannon, Phil G.; Hauff, Robert D.; Klopfenstein, Ned B.; Stewart, Jane E. 2019. Development of tools for early detection, monitoring and management of the koa wilt pathogen (Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. koae) in Hawaiíi. In: Cleaver, C.; Palacious, P., compilers. Proceedings of the 65th annual Western International Forest Disease Work Conference; 2-6 October 2017; Parksville, BC, Canada. WIFDWC. p. 105-108.

Publication Notes

  • We recommend that you also print this page and attach it to the printout of the article, to retain the full citation information.
  • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.
https://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/pubs/58912