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Metagenomic approaches to determine soil microbial communities associated with Armillaria root disease

Year:

2019

Publication type:

Scientific Journal (JRNL)

Primary Station(s):

Rocky Mountain Research Station

Source:

In: Cleaver, C.; Palacious, P., compilers. Proceedings of the 65th annual Western International Forest Disease Work Conference; 2-6 October 2017; Parksville, BC, Canada. WIFDWC. p. 123-126.

Description

Armillaria root disease causes extensive damage to tree roots throughout the world, but efficacious management practices are lacking. However, soil interactions among Armillaria species, microbial communities, and trees may determine the impact of pathogenic Armillaria on the growth and survival of trees. Two species, A. solidipes (highly virulent) and A. altimontana (less virulent), frequently co-occur in forests of inland northwestern USA. Soil metagenomics and metatransciptomics may provide key insights into how interactions among soil microbial communities and root pathogens influence disease severity. If we can understand how soil microbial communities influence Armillaria root disease, then we can potentially develop novel management techniques that enhance biocontrol microbes and favor microbial communities that suppress disease caused by virulent Armillaria species.

Citation

Lalande, Bradley; Abdo, Zaid; Hanna, John W.; Page-Dumroese, Deborah S.; Warwell, Marcus V.; Tirocke, Joanne M.; Kim, Mee-Sook; Klopfenstein, Ned B.; Stewart, Jane E. 2019. Metagenomic approaches to determine soil microbial communities associated with Armillaria root disease. In: Cleaver, C.; Palacious, P., compilers. Proceedings of the 65th annual Western International Forest Disease Work Conference; 2-6 October 2017; Parksville, BC, Canada. WIFDWC. p. 123-126.

Publication Notes

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https://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/pubs/58914