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    Author(s): Lori D. Daniels; Larissa L. Yocom Kent; Rosemary L. Sherriff; Emily K. Heyerdahl
    Date: 2017
    Source: In: Amoroso, Mariano M.; Daniels, Lori D.; Baker, Patrick J.; Camarero, J. Julio. Dendroecology: Tree-Ring Analyses Applied to Ecological Studies. Springer, Cham: Ecological Studies 231. p. 185-210.
    Publication Series: Scientific Journal (JRNL)
    Station: Rocky Mountain Research Station
    PDF: Download Publication  (765.0 KB)

    Description

    Wildfire is a key disturbance agent in forests worldwide, but recent large and costly fires have raised urgent questions about how different current fire regimes are from those of the past. Dendroecological reconstructions of historical fire frequency, severity, spatial variability, and extent, corroborated by other lines of evidence, are essential in addressing these questions. Existing methods can infer the severity of individual fires and stand-level fire regimes. However, novel research designs combining evidence of stand-level fire severity with fire extent are now being used to reconstruct spatial variability in historical fire regimes and to quantify the relative abundance of fire severity classes across landscapes, thereby facilitating comparison with modern fire regimes. Here we review how these new approaches build on traditional analyses of fire scars and forest age structures by presenting four case studies from the western United States and Canada. Collectively they demonstrate the importance of ecosystem-specific research that can guide management aiming to safeguard human, cultural and biological values in fire-prone forests and enhance forest resilience to the cumulative effects of global environmental change. Dendroecological reconstructions, combined with multiple lines of corroborating evidence, are key for achieving this goal.

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    Citation

    Daniels, Lori D.; Kent, Larissa L. Yocom; Sherriff, Rosemary L.; Heyerdahl, Emily K. 2017. Deciphering the complexity of historical fire regimes: Diversity among forests of western North America [Chapter 8]. In: Amoroso, Mariano M.; Daniels, Lori D.; Baker, Patrick J.; Camarero, J. Julio. Dendroecology: Tree-Ring Analyses Applied to Ecological Studies. Springer, Cham: Ecological Studies 231. p. 185-210.

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    Keywords

    fire history: fire scars, post-fire cohorts, pimulation modeling, Alberta, Arizona, British Columbia, Colorado, Oregon

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https://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/pubs/58945