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    Author(s): Rachel WhiteJanet PreveyTeresa HollingsworthHans Andersen
    Date: 2019
    Source: Science Update 26. Portland, OR: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Research Station. 15 p.
    Publication Series: Science Update
    Station: Pacific Northwest Research Station
    PDF: View PDF  (3.0 MB)

    Description

    The Arctic and boreal regions are warming more than twice as rapidly as the rest of the world. The timing of plants’ flowering and fruiting is changing, with implications for insects, wildlife, and people who rely on these resources for food and livelihoods in Alaska. Alaska’s boreal forest will undergo significant functional and structural changes within the next few decades that are unprecedented in the past 6,000 years. The Bonanza Creek Long-Term Ecological Research program is critical to Forest Service research because it is the only Forest Service outpost in the boreal forest, which is the biggest forest in the world. Pacific Northwest Research Station scientists are contributing groundbreaking climate research in Alaska, with global implications.

    Publication Notes

    • You may send email to pnw_pnwpubs@fs.fed.us to request a hard copy of this publication.
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    • We recommend that you also print this page and attach it to the printout of the article, to retain the full citation information.
    • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.

    Citation

    White, Rachel; Prevey, Janet; Hollingsworth, Teresa; Andersen, Hans. 2019. Warming in the Cold North. Science Update 26. Portland, OR: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Research Station. 15 p.

    Keywords

    Climate vulnerability assessment, boreal ecology, permafrost, plant phenology, remote sensing.

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https://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/pubs/59190