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    Author(s): Wayne D. Shepperd; Carleton B. Edminster; Stephen A. Mata
    Date: 2006
    Source: Western Journal of Applied Forestry. 21(1): 19-26.
    Publication Series: Scientific Journal (JRNL)
    Station: Rocky Mountain Research Station
    PDF: Download Publication  (171.0 KB)

    Description

    Seedfall, natural regeneration establishment, and growth of planted seedlings was observed from 1981 to 2001 under shelterwood and seedtree overstories in a replicated study in ponderosa pine in the Manitou Experimental Forest in the Colorado Front Range. Good seed crops were produced only every 4 to 6 years, with almost no viable seed produced in intervening years. With seed predation, only 14% of total seedfall was available for germination. Shelterwood overstories containing between 6 and 14 m2 ha_1 stem basal area over scarified seedbeds provided optimal conditions for natural seedling establishment. Survival and growth of planted seedlings was much better than that of natural seedlings. However, poor survival and slow initial growth may require many years to establish a fully stocked forest of natural seedlings.

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    Citation

    Shepperd, Wayne D.; Edminster, Carleton B.; Mata, Stephen A. 2006. Long-term seedfall, establishment, survival, and growth of natural and planted ponderosa pine in the Colorado Front Range. Western Journal of Applied Forestry. 21(1): 19-26.

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    Keywords

    Pinus ponderosa, silviculture, regeneration, seed viability

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https://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/pubs/59226