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    Author(s): Martha R. McKevlin; William H. McKee
    Date: 1986
    Source: Forest Ecology and Management
    Publication Series: Scientific Journal (JRNL)
    Station: Southern Research Station
    PDF: Download Publication  (296.0 KB)

    Description

    McKevlin, M.R. and McKee, W.H., Jr., 1986. Long-term prescribed burning increases nutrient uptake and growth of loblolly pine seedlings. Loblolly pine ( Pinus taeda L.) seedlings were grown from seed in a greenhouse on Al horizon soil collected from field plots that have been burned each winter or maintained in an unburned condition for 33 years. Soils from burned and unburned plots were treated with phosphorus (P) , P and calcium (Ca) , or left untreated. After 32 weeks, height, biomass, and nitrogen (N) and P uptake were greater on soil from burned versus unburned plots, although application of P masked these effects. Addition of P increased plant biomass, seedling height, and uptake of N and P, but depressed levels of soil NH.-N. These results suggest that long-term prescribed burning may have a positive effect on nutrient availability that will benefit seedlings of the next stand.

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    Citation

    McKevlin, Martha R.; McKee, William H. Jr. 1986. Long-term prescribed burning increases nutrient uptake and growth of loblolly pine seedlings. Forest Ecology and Management. 17: 245-252.

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