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    Author(s): Amanda A. Lindsay; James D. Johnston
    Date: 2020
    Source: In: Pile, Lauren S.; Deal, Robert L.; Dey, Daniel C.; Gwaze, David; Kabrick, John M.; Palik, Brian; Schuler, Thomas M., comps. The 2019 National Silviculture Workshop: a focus on forest management-research partnerships. Gen. Tech. Rep. NRS-P-193. Madison, WI: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Northern Research Station: 23-33.
    Publication Series: Paper (invited, offered, keynote)
    Station: Northern Research Station
    PDF: Download Publication  (1.0 MB)

    Description

    The Malheur National Forest works collaboratively with diverse stakeholders to accelerate the pace and scale of forest restoration. Both informal joint fact-finding, empirical research, and multi-party monitoring are used to inform planning and adjust implementation of restoration treatments in an adaptive management framework. Knowledge of historical dynamics is often used to guide restoration on the Malheur because scientists, managers, and stakeholders believe restoring forest structure and composition to the historical range of variability will make forests more resilient to future climate and disturbance regimes. There is a strong shared understanding of the role of frequent, low-intensity fire in fostering resilience of dry, ponderosa pine dominated forests. However, there has been little empirical research describing historical disturbance dynamics in moister landscape settings. USDA Forest Service silviculturists and researchers from Oregon State University investigated historical fire patterns, forest structure, and composition in moist mixed conifer stands on the Malheur National Forest. The findings of this partnership demonstrate that moist mixed conifer forests historically experienced similar fire return intervals, had similar basal area, and in most cases are more departed from historical conditions than dry ponderosa pine forests. Tools were also developed to aid in selection of large-diameter, fire-intolerant species for removal. This research and ongoing fact-finding and dialogue with stakeholders have been used to adapt silvicultural prescriptions over time. A multi-party monitoring program is being implemented to answer stakeholder questions about the effects of restoration treatments, while generating baseline data to answer questions about intermediate and long-term environmental effects.

    Publication Notes

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    Citation

    Lindsay, Amanda A.; Johnston, James D. 2020. Using historical reconstructions of moist mixed conifer forests to inform forest management on the Malheur National Forest. In: Pile, Lauren S.; Deal, Robert L.; Dey, Daniel C.; Gwaze, David; Kabrick, John M.; Palik, Brian; Schuler, Thomas M., comps. The 2019 National Silviculture Workshop: a focus on forest management-research partnerships. Gen. Tech. Rep. NRS-P-193. Madison, WI: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Northern Research Station: 23-33. https://doi.org/10.2737/NRS-GTR-P-193-paper4.

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    Keywords

    collaborative, co-production, stewardship, implementation, relationship building

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https://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/pubs/60238