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    Author(s): A.B. Carey
    Date: 2003
    Source: In: Monserud, R.A.; Haynes, R.W.; Johnson, A.C., eds. Compatible Forest Mangement. Dordrecht, The Netherlands: Kluwer Academic Publishers: 401-425.
    Publication Series: Scientific Journal (JRNL)
    PDF: View PDF  (857 KB)

    Description

    Why manage for wildlife in U.S. forests? American society demands it. Which species should be favored? The social and cultural value of individual species continue to evolve. Large changes have taken place in less than 40 years; Kimmins (2002) states that changes in societal values have produced “future shock” in the forestry profession, with foresters and their institutions unable to adapt. Public demand for wildlife conservation has resulted in a long chain of legislation governing federal lands and supporting state and private wildlife conservation efforts (Hunter 1990). Nevertheless, controversies over forest management continue, and have led to a shift from active management for wildlife to establishment of large reserves off limits to active management (Hunter 1999). Now attention is shifting to second-growth forests where the public is concerned about biodiversity and ecosystem health (Hunter 1999, Lindenmayer and Franklin 2002, Shields et al. 2002). Public scrutiny is no longer limited to federal lands. State agencies have recognized the need to address public concerns (Belcher 2001). Efforts to conserve wildlife on privately held forests are on the rise (Best and Wayburn 2001). Wood products companies find it necessary to develop compatible management approaches, including habitat conservation plans (Loehle et al. 2002). Public focus on wildlife conservation extends worldwide, even to coffee plantations http://www.starbucks.com/aboutus/csr.asp). As public interest expands, it is prudent to ask what trends in values are relative to forest wildlife.

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    Citation

    Carey, A.B. 2003. Managing for wildlife: a key component for social acceptance of compatible forest management. In: Monserud, R.A.; Haynes, R.W.; Johnson, A.C., eds. Compatible Forest Mangement. Dordrecht, The Netherlands: Kluwer Academic Publishers: 401-425.

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