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    Author(s): Richard J. Blaustein
    Date: 2001
    Source: In: McNeeley, J. A. ed. The Great Reshuffling: Human Dimensions of Invasive Species. IUCN, Gland, Switzerland and Cambridge, UK. The World Conservation Union: 55-62.
    Publication Series: Miscellaneous Publication
    PDF: View PDF  (55 KB)

    Description

    Kudzu, a perennial vine native to Japan and China, was first introduced into the USA in 1876 and was actively promoted by the government as a "wonderplant", It expanded to cover over 1 million ha by 1946 and well over 2 million ha today. When Kudzu invades a forest, it prevents the growth of young hardwoods and kills off other plants. Kudzu causes damage to powerlines, and even overwhelms homes, Kudzu has invaded important protected areas, requiring significant investment of management resources, The management response to date outside the protected areas has been insufficient to deal with this very significant threat.

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    Citation

    Blaustein, Richard J. 2001. Kudzu''s invasion into Southern United states life and culture. In: McNeeley, J. A. ed. The Great Reshuffling: Human Dimensions of Invasive Species. IUCN, Gland, Switzerland and Cambridge, UK. The World Conservation Union: 55-62.

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