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    Author(s): Robert A. Sargent; John C. Kilgo; Brian R. Chapman; Karl V. Miller
    Date: 2003
    Source: Southeastern Naturalist 2(2):217-222. 2003.
    Publication Series: Miscellaneous Publication
    PDF: View PDF  (108 KB)

    Description

    We studied nesting success of the Wood Thrush (Hylocichla mustelina) in bottomland and upland hardwood forests in South Carolina. Twenty-one of 26 nests (80.8%) were located in bottomland sites, and 76.2% of these nests were in narrow (<150-m wide) bottomland corridors. No nests were found in upland sites enclosed by fields. The Mayfield success rate for 20 nests was 35.3%. All nest failures were attributed to predation; no nests were parasitized by Brown-headed Cowbirds (Molothrus ater). Nest sites were characterized by a dense overstory and a moderately developed understory. Bottomland hardwoods, especially relatively narrow corridors, appear to provide suitable nesting habitat for Wood Thrush in this region. Brood parasitism by Brown- headed Cowbirds does not appear to be a significant factor in the failure of Wood Thrush nests in these sites.

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    Citation

    Sargent, Robert A.; Kilgo, John C.; Chapman, Brian R.; Miller, Karl V. 2003. Nesting Ecology of Wood Thrush (Turdidae: Passeriformes) in Hardwood Forests of South Carolina. Southeastern Naturalist 2(2):217-222. 2003.

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