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Assessments of population structure, diversity, and phylogeography of the Swiss needle cast fungus (Phaeocryptopus gaeumannii) in the U.S. Pacific Northwest

Author(s):

Jeffrey Stone

Year:

2016

Publication type:

Scientific Journal (JRNL)

Primary Station(s):

Rocky Mountain Research Station

Source:

Forests. 7(1): 14.

Description

Swiss needle cast (SNC) is a foliar disease of Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) caused by Phaeocryptopus gaeumannii (Rohde) Petrak. This fungus is endemic to western North America, where it has historically had little impact in native forests. However, increasing disease severity in western Oregon since the 1990s has prompted renewed interest in P. gaeumannii and SNC. For this study, we analyze multilocus microsatellite genotypes from 482 single-spore isolates from 68 trees across 14 sites in the western Coast Range of Oregon and southwestern Washington. This study assesses genotypic variation and genetic structure at several levels of population hierarchy. Despite the observation that most of the genetic variation occurred within subpopulations, our analyses detected significant differentiation at all hierarchical levels. Clustering among the 482 isolates based on genetic distance clearly supports the existence of two previously described cryptic lineages of P. gaeumannii in the western United States. The two lineages occur in varying proportions along latitudinal and longitudinal gradients in western Oregon and Washington, suggesting a relationship between climate and phylogeography. Sites near Tillamook, Oregon, where SNC is most severe, consist of sympatric subpopulations in which the two lineages comprise roughly equal proportions.

Citation

Bennett, Patrick; Stone, Jeffrey. 2016. Assessments of population structure, diversity, and phylogeography of the Swiss needle cast fungus (Phaeocryptopus gaeumannii) in the U.S. Pacific Northwest. Forests. 7(1): 14.

Cited

Publication Notes

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https://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/pubs/63165