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Evidence for climate as a driver of genetic divergence in native populations of the Douglas-fir Swiss needle cast fungus Phaeocryptopus gaeumannii

Author(s):

Jeff Stone

Year:

2018

Publication type:

Paper (invited, offered, keynote)

Primary Station(s):

Rocky Mountain Research Station

Source:

In: Cleaver, C.; Palacios, P., domps. Proceedings of the 65th Annual Western International Forest Disease Work Conference; 2017 October 2-6; Parksville, British Columbia. p. 85-92.

Description

Swiss needle cast (SNC) is a Douglas-fir foliage disease caused by the fungus Phaeocryptopus gaeumannii Rohde (Petrak). The spore-bearing structures of this fungus (pseudothecia) occlude the stomata in Douglas-fir needles resulting in an inhibition of gas exchange and photosynthesis, premature foliage loss, and reduced growth (Hansen et al., 2000; Manter et al., 2000). The volume growth reductions inflicted by SNC can exceed 50% in severely diseased stands (Maguire et al., 2011). Since the 1990s, the disease has continued to intensify in coastal low-elevation forests in the Pacific Northwest due to a combination of factors, including forest management practices that have resulted in extensive young Douglas-fir plantations in the coastal Sitka spruce vegetation zone (Hansen et al., 2000; Shaw et al., 2011), and a climate that is conducive to P.gaeumannii infection (Hansen et al., 2000; Lee et al., 2013, 2016; Manter et al., 2005; Rosso and Hansen, 2003; Stone et al., 2007, 2008; Watt et al., 2010, 2011).

Citation

Bennett, Patrick; Stone, Jeff. 2018. Evidence for climate as a driver of genetic divergence in native populations of the Douglas-fir Swiss needle cast fungus Phaeocryptopus gaeumannii. In: Cleaver, C.; Palacios, P., domps. Proceedings of the 65th Annual Western International Forest Disease Work Conference; 2017 October 2-6; Parksville, British Columbia. p. 85-92.

Publication Notes

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https://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/pubs/63167