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    Author(s): David R. DeWalle; William E. Sharpe; Bryan R. Swistock
    Date: 2004
    Source: Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS-73. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. pp. 297-298
    Publication Series: Miscellaneous Publication
    PDF: View PDF  (118 KB)

    Description

    Bole-wood chemistry can be a useful indicator of the nutrient status of trees. Liming generally increases Ca and/or Mg and decreases Mn concentrations in bole-wood. Acidifying treatments, such as ammonium sulfate or nitrogen fertilizers without lime, generally cause Mn increases and concomitant decreases in Ca and Mg. Bole-wood concentration ratios of Ca/Mn have been found to be good indicators of soil alkalinization or acidification trends (DeWalle and others 1999). Whether the timing of past chemical changes in soil is accurately preserved in tree rings remains uncertain. In this study we had an opportunity to study bole-wood chemistry in Quercus spp. two decades after an acidifying N-only (AR site) and NPK+liming (MO site) treatment.

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    Citation

    DeWalle, David R.; Sharpe, William E.; Swistock, Bryan R. 2004. Oak Bole-Wood Chemistry Response to Fertilization at Two Ozark Sites. Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS-73. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. pp. 297-298

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