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    Author(s): Wayne K. Clatterbuck
    Date: 2004
    Source: Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS–71. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. pp. 184-186
    Publication Series: Miscellaneous Publication
    PDF: View PDF  (80 KB)

    Description

    Planting pine for conversion of former agricultural land to managed forests is well-documented, but little informa-tion is available for hardwood plantings. This study references three yellow poplar (Liriodendron tulipifera L.) plantations (ages 9, 12, and 18 years) on different sites totaling 95 acres. The sites were located in middle Tennessee along a site productivity gradient composed of a floodplain and terrace site near the Cumberland River and an upland footslope site. All three sites had been in row crops or pasture prior to planting. Tree survival at time of measurement was greater than 75 percent for all three plantings. Average annual diameter increment and height increment for the three plantations were 0.5 inch and 4.2 feet, respectively. Comparisons of age, height, diameter, basal area, density, site index, and volume are made between the planted yellow-poplar in this study and three other published studies: natural stands of yellow-poplar and two studies with planted loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.). Although site productivity and stand parameters differ among the studies, the growth of yellow-poplar plantations compares favorably with the natural stands of yellow-poplar and planted loblolly pine.

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    Citation

    Clatterbuck, Wayne K. 2004. Growth and Development of Yellow-Poplar Plantations On Three Sites Ranging From 9 to 18 Years. Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS–71. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. pp. 184-186

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