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    Author(s): Jared Verner
    Date: 2002
    Source: Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-183. Albany, CA: Pacific Southwest Research Station, Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture; 154 p
    Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)
    Station: Pacific Southwest Research Station
    PDF: View PDF  (7.0 MB)

    Description

    Ecosystem management aligns different uses of the land with ecological parameters and goals of environmental quality. An important USDA Forest Service mission is to balance the multiple uses of its lands in an ecologically sustainable way. This objective has been particularly challenging for National Forests of the Sierra Nevada in the face of heated controversies over the effects of even-aged timber harvest on old-growth forests and their associated wildlife, such as the California spotted owl (Strix occidentalis occidentalis). Much of the concern stems from loss of habitat attributes—closed-canopied stands, very old trees, large snags and downed wood, and multiple structural layers—believed to be needed by the owl and other wildlife species. Several of these attributes are also believed to be vital for sustaining healthy, productive forests

    Publication Notes

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    • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.

    Citation

    Verner, Jared. 2002. Proceedings of a Symposium on the Kings River Sustainable Forest Ecosystem Project: Progress and Current Status; January 26, 1998; Clovis, CA. Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-183. Albany, CA: Pacific Southwest Research Station, Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture; 154 p

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    Keywords

    hypogeous fungi, prescribed burning, fisher, forest management

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