Skip to Main Content
U.S. Forest Service
Caring for the land and serving people

United States Department of Agriculture

Home > Search > Publication Information

  1. Share via EmailShare on FacebookShare on LinkedInShare on Twitter
    Dislike this pubLike this pub
    Author(s): Kozma Naka; Philip G. Cannon
    Date: 2004
    Source: Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS–71. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. pp. 509-512
    Publication Series: Miscellaneous Publication
    PDF: View PDF  (706 KB)

    Description

    Many commercial hardwood species grow quite well in northern Alabama and most regenerate by stump sprouts after harvest. The number of sprouts on a stump depends on several factors such as species and stump size. To determine if the practice of singling (removing all but the single best sprout from a stump) might be a means of accelerating the growth rate of one stem from each stump, 145 pairs of stumps were chosen at 4 different clearcut areas on a forest industry tract in Lawrence County, AL. For each pair of stumps, one randomly selected stump was “singled,” while the other had no sprouts removed. Measurements taken 1 and 4 years later indicated that the sprouts of several species had very strong initial responses in diameter growth as a result of singling, especially the sprouts of the older stumps growing on moister sites.

    Publication Notes

    • You may send email to pubrequest@fs.fed.us to request a hard copy of this publication.
    • (Please specify exactly which publication you are requesting and your mailing address.)
    • We recommend that you also print this page and attach it to the printout of the article, to retain the full citation information.
    • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.

    Citation

    Naka, Kozma; Cannon, Philip G. 2004. Sprout Singling in North Alabama Hardwoods. Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS–71. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. pp. 509-512

    Related Search


    XML: View XML
Show More
Show Fewer
Jump to Top of Page
https://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/pubs/6748