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    Description

    Bearclover inhabits thousands of acres of forest land in northern and central California, but little quantification of its recovery after timber harvest, site preparation, and planting is available. And the species composition and development of the ensuing plant community is largely unknown. Density, foliar cover, and height of planted ponderosa pine seedlings, bearclover, whiteleaf manzanita, forbs, and grasses were documented from 1986 through 1996 in northern California. After 11 growing seasons, bearclover and planted ponderosa pines were dominating, whiteleaf manzanita was increasing, grasses were still numerous, and the forbs had come and gone. A total of 12 plant species were present at the beginning and end of the study, although 20 species were found during the study period. Elongation of bearclover rhizomes took place for 2 years after site preparation and then abruptly ceased.

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    Citation

    McDonald, Philip M.; Fiddler, Gary O. 1999. Recovery of a bearclover (Chamaebatia foliolosa) plant community after site preparation and planting of ponderosa pine seedlings. Res. Note PSW-RN-423. Albany, CA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Research Station. 7 p

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    Keywords

    bearclover, plant community, ponderosa pine seedlings, recovery, species development, vegetation management

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