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    Author(s): Russell T. GrahamTheresa Benavidez Jain
    Date: 2004
    Source: In: Shepperd, Wayne D.; Eskew, Lane G., compilers. 2004. Silviculture in special places: Proceedings of the National Silviculture Workshop; 2003 September 8-11; Granby, CO. Proceedings RMRS-P-34. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 1-14
    Publication Series: Proceedings (P)
    Station: Rocky Mountain Research Station
    PDF: View PDF  (863.67 KB)

    Description

    In general, silviculture can be defined as the art and science of controlling the establishment, growth, competition, health, and quality of forests and woodlands to meet the diverse needs and values of landowners and society on a sustainable basis (Helms 1998). This definition or variations of it have existed since the late 1800s. Gifford (1902), an Assistant Professor of Forestry at Cornell University in New York, used the term arboriculture to describe the growing of trees for any purpose and in any way whatever – singly, in groups, or in the form of forests. He went on to define silviculture as a part of the broader art of arboriculture. Schlich (1904), Professor of Forestry at the Royal Indian Engineering College, Coopers Hill, India, stated that “the culture of forests with the objective for which a particular forest is maintained depends on the will and pleasure of the owner, in so far as his freedom of action is not limited by rights of third persons or legal enactments.” He went on to say “silviculture, in its narrowest sense, is understanding the formation, regeneration and tending of forests until they become ripe for the axe.” Therefore, the beginning of silviculture in the United States was closely aligned with forest management, and the general theme of most silvicultural practices was to produce forest crops.

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    Citation

    Graham, Russell T.; Jain, Theresa Benavidez. 2004. Past, present, and future role of silviculture in forest management. In: Shepperd, Wayne D.; Eskew, Lane G., compilers. 2004. Silviculture in special places: Proceedings of the National Silviculture Workshop; 2003 September 8-11; Granby, CO. Proceedings RMRS-P-34. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 1-14

    Keywords

    silviculture, forest management

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