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    Author(s): Paul B. Alaback
    Date: 1984
    Source: Gen. Tech. Rep. PNW-GTR-173. Portland, OR: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Forest and Range Experiment Station. 26 p
    Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)
    Station: Pacific Northwest Research Station
    PDF: View PDF  (501.0 KB)

    Description

    Preliminary information on general landscape patterns in southeast Alaska suggests that two major, compositionally distinct vegetation zones can be defined for the closed-forest type: western hemlock-Sitka spruce/Alaska huckleberry/bunchberry on the uplands, and Sitka spruce/devils club-salmonberry on alluvial flats and terraces.

    Recent clearcuts (0 to 30 years old) produce the most shrubby vegetation of any age class in the forest succession. Even-aged forests (30 to 150 years old) produce the least understory vegetation. Uneven aged, old-growth forests sustain the most structurally diverse understory vegetation. Forests with open, patchy canopies tend to produce the most understory vegetation. More data is needed before forest management techniques can be successfully used to improve the quality of habitat for wildlife over that presently found in unmanaged old-growth forests.

    Publication Notes

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    • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.

    Citation

    Alaback, Paul B. 1984. Secondary succession following logging in the Sitka spruce western hemlock forests of southeast Alaska: Implications for wildlife management. Gen. Tech. Rep. PNW-GTR-173. Portland, OR: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Forest and Range Experiment Station. 26 p

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    Keywords

    Succession (secondary), biomass, understory layer, logging effects, logging (-wildlife, old-growth stands, wildlife management, Alaska (southeast), western hemlock, Sitka spruce

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