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    Author(s): Bret C. Harvey; Thomas E. Lisle
    Date: 1999
    Source: North American Journal of Fisheries Management 19(2): 613-617.
    Publication Series: Miscellaneous Publication
    PDF: View PDF  (78 KB)

    Description

    Abstract - We measured scour of the redds of chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha on dredge tailings and natural substrates in three tributaries of the Klamath River, California. We measured maximum scour with scour chains and net scour by surveying before and after high winter flows. Scour of chinook salmon redds located on dredge tailings exceeded scour of redds on natural substrates, although the difference varied among streams. Our results show that fisheries managers should consider the potential negative effects of dredge tailings on the spawning success of fall-spawning fishes such as chinook salmon and coho salmon O. kisutch.

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    Citation

    Harvey, Bret C.; Lisle, Thomas E. 1999. Scour of chinook salmon redds on suction dredge tailings. North American Journal of Fisheries Management 19(2): 613-617.

    Keywords

    PSW4351, chinook salmon, suction dredging, scour, dredging effects on fishes, streamflow, rainfall, spawning

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