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    Author(s): Thomas E. Lisle
    Date: 1997
    Source: In: Sari Sommarstrom (ed). What is watershed stability? Proceedings, Sixth Biennial Watershed Management Conference. 23-25 October 1996 Lake Tahoe, California/Nevada. University of California, Water Resources Center Report No. 92, Davis, California. p. 57-67.
    Publication Series: Miscellaneous Publication
    PDF: View PDF  (221 KB)

    Description

    Abstract - Dynamic equilibrium in stream channels has traditionally been applied on the reach scale, where fluxes of water and sediment into a reach result in rapid but minor adjustments of channel dimensions, hydraulics or roughness (equilibrium), or aggradation and degradation (disequilibrium). Such an essentially one-dimensional spatial approach to sediment-channel interactions implicitly avoids a long standing and difficult problem: how do large inputs of sediment travel through channel systems and thereby distribute the fluxes to which channels respond at any time scale?

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    Citation

    Lisle, Thomas E. 1997. Understanding the role of sediment waves and channel conditions over time and space. In: Sari Sommarstrom (ed). What is watershed stability? Proceedings, Sixth Biennial Watershed Management Conference. 23-25 October 1996 Lake Tahoe, California/Nevada. University of California, Water Resources Center Report No. 92, Davis, California. p. 57-67.

    Keywords

    PSW4351, channel conditions, sediment movement, dynamic equilibrium

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