Skip to Main Content
U.S. Forest Service
Caring for the land and serving people

United States Department of Agriculture

Home > Search > Publication Information

  1. Share via EmailShare on FacebookShare on LinkedInShare on Twitter
    Dislike this pubLike this pub
    Author(s): Tom Lisle
    Date: 1999
    Source: In: Taylor, Ross N. (ed.). Proceedings of a Workshop, Using Stream Geomorphic Characteristics as a Long-term Monitoring Tool to Assess Watershed Function, 18-19 March 1999, Humboldt State University, Arcata, California. p. 4-14.
    Publication Series: Miscellaneous Publication
    PDF: View PDF  (96 KB)

    Description

    Purpose of this presentation is to put channel monitoring in context of channel processes and dispel the myth of the learned sage walking up the stream channel observing changes in the channel and extrapolating how these changes came about without looking at the rest of the watershed. The message I want to convey is it is not only O.K.to peek at the rest of the watershed, but it is necessary to understand why change has occurred. Many of the other speakers over the next two days will probably reiterate this same point, again and again.

    Publication Notes

    • You may send email to rmrspubrequest@fs.fed.us to request a hard copy of this publication.
    • (Please specify exactly which publication you are requesting and your mailing address.)
    • We recommend that you also print this page and attach it to the printout of the article, to retain the full citation information.
    • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.

    Citation

    Lisle, Tom 1999. Channel processes and watershed function. In: Taylor, Ross N. (ed.). Proceedings of a Workshop, Using Stream Geomorphic Characteristics as a Long-term Monitoring Tool to Assess Watershed Function, 18-19 March 1999, Humboldt State University, Arcata, California. p. 4-14.

    Keywords

    PSW4351, Caspar Creek, watershed, channel processes, land-use practices, hillslope disturbance, sediment, woody debris

    Related Search


    XML: View XML
Show More
Show Fewer
Jump to Top of Page