Skip to Main Content
U.S. Forest Service
Caring for the land and serving people

United States Department of Agriculture

Home > Search > Publication Information

  1. Share via EmailShare on FacebookShare on LinkedInShare on Twitter
    Dislike this pubLike this pub
    Author(s): Valerie Rapp
    Date: 2005
    Source: Science Update 9. Portland, OR: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Research Station. 12 p
    Publication Series: Science Update
    Station: Pacific Northwest Research Station
    PDF: View PDF  (1.0 MB)

    Description

    A plant species is defined as invasive if it is nonnative to the ecosystem under consideration, and if it causes or is likely to cause economic or environmental harm or harm to human health. Nonnative plant invasions are generally considered to have reached the Pacific Northwest in the mid-1800s with the arrival of European-American settlers. Invasive species such as sulfur cinquefoil, spotted knapweed, yellow starthistle, cheatgrass, and Japanese knotweed can displace native plants, disrupt ecosystems, affect biological diversity, increase soil erosion, reduce water quality, and change natural fire regimes. These and other invasive plants affect ecosystems from arid grasslands to forests,wetlands, and streams.

    Publication Notes

    • You may send email to pnw_pnwpubs@fs.fed.us to request a hard copy of this publication.
    • (Please specify exactly which publication you are requesting and your mailing address.)
    • We recommend that you also print this page and attach it to the printout of the article, to retain the full citation information.
    • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.

    Citation

    Rapp, Valerie. 2005. Invasive plants in 21st Century landscapes. Science Update 9. Portland, OR: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Research Station. 12 p

    Related Search


    XML: View XML
Show More
Show Fewer
Jump to Top of Page
https://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/pubs/8884