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    Author(s): Darrel D. Nicholas; Douglas Crawford
    Date: 2003
    Source: Wood deterioration and preservation : advances in our changing world. Washington, DC : American Chemical Society, c2003. ACS symposium series ; 845: Pages 288-312
    Publication Series: Miscellaneous Publication
    PDF: View PDF  (714 KB)

    Description

    Efforts to develop new environmentally friendly wood preservatives are seriously handicapped by the extended time period required to carry out the evaluation needed to establish confidence in the long term performance of new preservative systems. Studies in our laboratory have shown that using strength loss as a measure of the extent of wood decay makes it possible to detect the early stages of decay that results from non-ezymatic reactions. We have developed specialized equipment and techniques that have applications for both above ground and soil contact preservative systems. By coupling these evaluation techniques with a better understanding of moisture control, microbial succession, soil chemistry and soil microbial dynamics, it may be possible to develop improved test methods that can greatly reduce the time required to evaluate wood preservative systems.

    Publication Notes

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    • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.

    Citation

    Nicholas, Darrel D.; Crawford, Douglas 2003. Concepts in the development of new accelerated test methods for wood decay. Wood deterioration and preservation : advances in our changing world. Washington, DC : American Chemical Society, c2003. ACS symposium series ; 845: Pages 288-312

    Keywords

    Wood decay, test methods, wood preservation

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