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    Author(s): Douglas A. Eza; James W. McMinn; Peter E. Dress
    Date: 1984
    Source: Gen. Tech. Rep. SE-28. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southeastern Forest Experiment Station. 6 p.
    Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)
    Station: Southeastern Forest Experiment Station
    PDF: View PDF  (106 KB)

    Description

    Successful development of woody biomass for energy will depend on the distribution of local supply and demand within subregions, rather than on the total inventory of residues. The Wood Residue Distribution Simulator (WORDS) attempts to find a least-cost allocation of residues from local sources of supply to local sources of demand, given the cost of the materials, their distribution, and the distribution of demand. The results areuseful in evaluating the feasibility of developing wood energy either for a subregion in general or for specific locales. This paper describes WORDS and gives an example of its application to mill residues in the State of Georgia.

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    • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.

    Citation

    Eza, Douglas A.; McMinn, James W.; Dress, Peter E. 1984. Wood Residue Distribution Simulator (WORDS). Gen. Tech. Rep. SE-28. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southeastern Forest Experiment Station. 6 p.

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    Keywords

    energy, supply, demand, Georgia

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