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    Author(s): James M. Guldin
    Date: 2004
    Source: In: Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS–75. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. Chapter 9. p. 83-95.
    Publication Series: Miscellaneous Publication
    PDF: View PDF  (1.5 MB)

    Description

    It is projected that plantations will make up 25 percent of the South's forest land area by the year 2040. Thus the remaining 75 percent of that area will consist of naturally regenerated pine, pine-hardwood, and hardwood stands. Naturally regenerated pines can be managed successfully by even-aged and unevenaged silvicultural systems when the reproduction cutting method is properly planned and executed, and when there is timely application of site preparation, release, and intermediate treatments to ensure seedling establishment and development. Attention to residual basal area, seed production, preparation of suitable seedbeds, control of competing vegetation, and timely density control are important to the successful management of naturally regenerated stands.

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    Citation

    Guldin, James M. 2004. Reproduction cutting methods for naturally regenerated pine stands in the south. In: Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS–75. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. Chapter 9. p. 83-95.

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