Skip to Main Content
U.S. Forest Service
Caring for the land and serving people

United States Department of Agriculture

Home > Search > Publication Information

  1. Share via EmailShare on FacebookShare on LinkedInShare on Twitter
    Dislike this pubLike this pub
    Author(s): D.P. Gwaze; Larry H. Lott; C. Dana Nelson
    Date: 2003
    Source: In: Proceedings of the 27th Southern Forest Tree Improvement Conference, June 24-27, Stillwater, Oklahoma, ed. Mckinley, Craig R., p. 63-71
    Publication Series: Miscellaneous Publication
    PDF: View PDF  (454 KB)

    Description

    The study objective was to determine whether selection for brown spot disease (caused by Scirrhia acicola (Dearn.) Siggers) resistance in longleaf pine (Pinus palustris Mill.) is beneficial for areas where brown spot is not present. Two groups of selections, comprising those that performed (survival and growth) well in the presence of brown spot disease and those that performed well in its absence, were selected. These selections were made in tests planted on the Harrison Experimental Forest (HEF) in southeast Mississippi. Within selection groups, the selections were mated in a partial diallel and their progeny were planted in replicated tests on two sites at the HEF. At one site, all trees were sprayed with a fungicide to protect the trees from brown spot disease, while at the other site no protection was provided. Brown spot infection was assessed one year after planting, and survival and height were assessed at years 1, 2, 3, 4, and 7. Overall, survival was significantly lower and disease incidence higher at the unsprayed site. At 7 years, survival at the unsprayed site was 73% for families selected in the presence of brown spot and 59% for the families selected in the absence of brown spot. Brown spot infection was significantly lower in the families selected in the presence of brown spot when planted at the unsprayed site, indicating that selection for brown spot resistance was effective. At 7 years, families selected in the presence of brown spot were significantly taller at the unsprayed site, but were significantly shorter at the sprayed site. Thus, selection for brown spot resistance is beneficial for those areas where brown spot disease is present, but not for areas where brown spot is controlled or absent.

    Publication Notes

    • You may send email to pubrequest@fs.fed.us to request a hard copy of this publication.
    • (Please specify exactly which publication you are requesting and your mailing address.)
    • We recommend that you also print this page and attach it to the printout of the article, to retain the full citation information.
    • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.

    Citation

    Gwaze, D.P.; Lott, Larry H.; Nelson, C. Dana. 2003. The efficacy of breeding for brown spot disease resistance in longleaf pine. In: Proceedings of the 27th Southern Forest Tree Improvement Conference, June 24-27, Stillwater, Oklahoma, ed. Mckinley, Craig R., p. 63-71

    Keywords

    Brown spot needle blight, disease resistance, Pinus palustris

    Related Search


    XML: View XML
Show More
Show Fewer
Jump to Top of Page
https://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/pubs/9837