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75 results found
We investigated herbaceous richness and cover in relation to fire season and severity, and other variables, five growing seasons following prescribed fires. Data were collected from six stands consisting of three randomly applied treatments: no burn, spring burn, and fall burn. Fall burns had…
Author(s): Becky K. Kerns, Walter G. Thies, Christine G. Niwa
Keywords: Bromus tectorum, CART, exotic species, forest understory, ponderosa pine, prescribed fire
Source: Ecoscience. Vol. 13(1): 44-55
Year: 2006
Land managers need more information on native forb growth and interactions between forbs and grasses to improve degraded sagebrush steppe habitats in the Great Basin, and to increase the diversity of revegetation seed mixes. This is especially important in areas infested with Bromus tectorum (…
Author(s): Hillary Ann Parkinson
Keywords: native forb growth, grasses, Great Basin, cheatgrass, Bromus tectorum
Source: Bozeman, MT: Montana State University. Thesis. 77 p.
Year: 2008
The competitive environment into which plant seedlings emerge often determines the survival and performance of these individuals. This study was designed to determine the effects of bluebunch wheatgrass (Pseudoroegneria spicata), crested wheatgrass (Agropyron cristatum), and cheatgrass (Bromus…
Author(s): Derek B. Hall, Val Jo Anderson, Stephen B. Monsen
Keywords: Pseudoroegneria spicata, Agropyron cristatum, Bromus tectorum, Purshia tridentata, Rununculus testiculatus, xylem pressure potential, soil moisture, rangeland restoration
Source: Res. Pap. RMRS-RP-16. Ogden, UT: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. 7 p.
Year: 1999
Invasions by nonnative plant species such as cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum) are a major concern in many ecosystems worldwide. When invasive nonnative species dominate a new ecosystem, they can alter biodiversity, species composition, nutrient cycles, disturbance regimes, and other ecosystem functions…
Author(s): Christopher M. McGlone
Keywords: cheatgrass, Bromus tectorum, native plant species, nonnative plant species, invasives
Source: Flagstaff, AZ: Northern Arizona University. 133 p. Dissertation.
Year: 2010
Attack by pathogens can have ecological consequences for plants at many scales, such as the individual, population and community scale, although the latter is the least studied. Community-level consequences of disease in natural plant communities can drive facilitation in succession (Van der Putten…
Author(s): Julie Beckstead, Susan E. Meyer, Brian M. Connolly, Michael B. Huck, Laura E. Street
Keywords: apparent competition, Bromus tectorum, Drechslera campanulata, multiple-host pathogen, pathogen spillover, Pyrenophora semeniperda, seed pathogen
Source: Journal of Ecology. 98: 168-177.
Year: 2010
The generalist pathogen Pyrenophora semeniperda is abundant in seed banks of the exotic winter annual grass Bromus tectorum in semiarid western North America and is also found in the seed banks of co-occurring native grasses. In this study, we examined natural incidence of disease caused by this…
Author(s): Susan E. Meyer, Julie Beckstead, Phil S. Allen, Duane C. Smith
Keywords: conidia, Bromus tectorum, Drechslera campanulata, Elymus elymoides, Leymus cinereus, Pyrenophora semeniperda, spore dispersal
Source: Canadian Journal of Plant Pathology. 30(4): 525-533.
Year: 2008
Ecosystem susceptibility to invasion by nonnative species is poorly understood, but evidence is increasing that spatial and temporal variability in resources has large-scale effects. We conducted a study in Artemisia tridentata ecosystems at two Great Basin locations examining differences in…
Author(s): Jeanne C. Chambers, Bruce A. Roundy, Robert R. Blank, Susan E. Meyer, A. Whittaker
Keywords: Artemisia tridentata, Bromus tectorum, ecological resistance, elevation gradient, fire, invasibility, plant removal, resource availability
Source: Ecological Monographs. 77(1): 117-145.
Year: 2007
Invasive annual grasses, such as cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum), create changes in soil microorganism communities and severely limit shrub establishment, a situation that is of considerable inportance to land managers. We examined the effects of biological crustforming algae and arbuscular…
Author(s): Rosemary L. Pendleton, Burton K. Pendleton, Steven D. Warren, Jeffrey R. Johansen, Larry L. St. Clair
Keywords: wildland shrubs, fire, water, shrub establishment, cheatgrass, Bromus tectorum, soil microorganisms
Source: In: Sosebee, Ronald E.; Wester, David B.; Britton, Carlton M.; McArthur, E. Durant; Kitchen, Stanley G., comps. Proceedings: Shrubland dynamics -- fire and water; 2004 August 10-12; Lubbock, TX. Proceedings RMRS-P-47. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 136-141.
Year: 2007
Semi-desert grasslands flank the “Sky Island” mountains in southern Arizona and Northern Mexico. Many of these grasslands are dominated by nonnative grasses, which potentially alter native biotic communities. One specific concern is the potential for a predicted feedback between nonnative grasses…
Author(s): Erika L. Geiger, Guy R. McPherson
Keywords: Cenchrus ciliarus, Bromus rubens, Bromus tectorum, Eragrostis lehmanninana, Pennisetum setaceum, fires, fire regimes, grasses, nonnative plants, plant communities, Arizona, New Mexico
Source: Gottfried, Gerald J.; Gebow, Brooke S.; Eskew, Lane G.; Edminster, Carleton B., comps. Connecting mountain islands and desert seas: biodiversity and management of the Madrean Archipelago II. Proc. RMRS-P-36. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station: 465-468
Year: 2005
The demand for strategic planning tools that account for climate and human influences on wildfire hazard is growing. In response, the University of Arizona, through an EPA STAR Grant has undertaken interdisciplinary research to characterize the human and climate dimensions of wildfire. The…
Author(s): Barron J. Orr, Wolfgang Grunberg, Amanda B. Cockerham, Anne Y. Thwaits, Heather S. Severson, Noah M. D. Lerman, Rachel M. Miller, Michael Haseltine, Barbara J. Morehouse, Jonathan T. Overpeck, Stephen R. Yool, Thomas W. Swetnam, Gary L. Christopherson
Keywords: Cenchrus ciliarus, Bromus rubens, Bromus tectorum, Eragrostis lehmanninana, Pennisetum setaceum, planning, wildfires, climate, human activity, models, internet, Sky Islands, Arizona
Source: In: Gottfried, Gerald J.; Gebow, Brooke S.; Eskew, Lane G.; Edminster, Carleton B., comps. Connecting mountain islands and desert seas: biodiversity and management of the Madrean Archipelago II. Proc. RMRS-P-36. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 469-473
Year: 2005
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