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41 results found
Experimental prescriptions compare agroforestry systems designed to increase financial returns from high-elevation stands in the southern Oregon Cascade Range. The prescriptions emphasize alternative approaches for joint production of North American matsutake mushrooms (also known as North American…
Author(s): James F. Weigand
Keywords: Tricholoma magnivelare, agroforestry systems, nontimber forest products, adaptive management, Abies magnifica, Tsuga mertensiana, Pinus contorta, Pinus monticola, Abies amabilis, tree pruning
Source: Gen. Tech. Rep. PNW-GTR-424. Portland, OR: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Research Station. 42 p
Year: 1998
Provisional seed zones and breeding zones were developed for white pine (Pinus monticola Dougl. ex D. Don) in the Cascade Range of western Washington and Oregon. Recommendations were based on genetic variation patterns obtained by evaluating genotypes of trees from 115 locations. Genotypes…
Author(s): Robert K. Campbell, Albert I. Sugano
Keywords: Genetic variation, geographic variation, adaptation (plant), seed-transfer, Pinus monticola
Source: Res. Pap. PNW-RP-407. Portland, OR: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Research Station. 20 p
Year: 1989
Height growth and site index curves were constructed from stem analyses of mature western white pine (Pinus monticola Dougl. ex D. Don) growing in high-elevation forests of the Cascade Range in the Mount Hood and Gifford Pinchot National Forests of Oregon and Washington, respectively.…
Author(s): Robert O. Curtis, Nancy M. Diaz, Gary W. Clendenen
Keywords: Site index, height growth curves, stem analysis, western white pine, Pinus monticola
Source: Res. Pap. PNW-RP-423. Portland, OR: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Research Station. 14 p.
Year: 1990
This report comprises a handbook for managing western white pine in northern ldaho and western Montana, under the threat of white pine blister rust. Various sections cover the history of the disease and efforts to combat it, the ecology of the white pine and Ribes, alternate host of the rust, and…
Author(s): Susan K. Hagle, Geral I. McDonald, Eugene A. Norby
Keywords: silviculture, timber management, plant pathology, Ribes spp, forest genetics, reforestation, Pinus monticola
Source: Gen. Tech. Rep. INT-261. Ogden, UT: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Intermountain Research Station. 35 p.
Year: 1989
Western white pine (Pinus monticola) is an economically and ecologically important species from western North America that has declined over the past several decades mainly due to the introduction of blister rust (Cronartium ribicola) and reduced opportunities for regeneration. Amplified fragment…
Author(s): M. -S. Kim, S. J. Brunsfeld, G. I. McDonald, N. B. Klopfenstein
Keywords: Pinus monticola, Cronartium ribicola, Amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP), breeding stock, genetic variation, white pine blister rust
Source: Theoretical and Applied Genetics. 106(6): 1004-1010.
Year: 2003
We evaluated nutrient uptake efficiency and subsequent leaching fractions for western white pine (Pinus monticola Dougl. ex D. Don) seedlings grown with exponentially increasing or conventional (constant) fertilization in a greenhouse. Conventional fertilization was associated with higher leachate…
Author(s): R. Kasten Dumroese, Deborah S. Page-Dumroese, K. Francis Salifu, Douglass F. Jacobs
Keywords: western white pine, Pinus monticola, seedlings
Source: Canadian Journal of Forest Research. 35: 2961-2967.
Year: 2005
When a western white pine (Pinus monticola Dougl. ex D. Don) tree dies, it undergoes a series of physical changes. The effects of these changes on product recovery are evaluated. Tabular information and prediction equations provide the tools necessary for using this resource.
Author(s): Thomas A. Snellgrove, James M. Cahill
Keywords: dead timber, lumber recovery, lumber yield, wood utilization, deterioration (wood), western white pine (dead), Pinus monticola
Source: Res. Pap. PNW-RP-270. Portland, OR: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Forest and Range Experiment Station. 72 p. (35 p. and 37 p.)
Year: 1980
White pine blister rust disease, caused by the introduced pathogen Cronartium ribicola, has severely disrupted five-needled pine ecosystems in North America. A 100-year effort to manage this disease was predicated in part on the premise that the pathogen utilizes only species of Ribes (…
Author(s): Geral I. McDonald, Bryce A. Richardson, Paul J. Zambino, Ned B. Klopfenstein, Mee-Sook Kim
Keywords: Cronartium ribicola, Pedicularis racemosa, Castilleja miniata, Ribes, Pinus monticola, Pinus albicaulis, plant diseases, epidemiology, pathogens, hosts, adaptation, Idaho
Source: Forest Pathology. 36(2): 73-82.
Year: 2006
The stable oxygen isotope ratio (δ18O) of tree-ring cellulose is jointly determined by the δ18O of xylem water, the δ18O of atmospheric water vapor, the humidity of the atmosphere and perhaps by species-specific differences in leaf structure and function. Atmospheric humidity and the δ18O of water…
Author(s): John D. Marshall, Robert A. Monserud
Keywords: cellulose, climate, conifers, Pinus monticola, Pinus ponderosa, Pseudotsuga menziesii, stable oxygen isotope ratio, tree rings
Source: Tree Physiology. 26: 1055-1066
Year: 2006
Necrotic reactions in branch or main stems of western white pine (Pinus monticola Dougl.) caused by infection by the blister rust fungus (Cronartium ribicola J. C. Fisch. ex Rabenh.) are a major mechanism of resistance. Overall, 26 percent of the seedlings eliminated the fungus via this defense…
Author(s): Ray J. Hoff
Keywords: Pinus monticola, Cronartium ribicola, blister rust resistance
Source: Research Note INT-361. Ogden, UT: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Intermountain Research Station. 8 p.
Year: 1986
https://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/search/query?f%5B0%5D=publication_keywords%3APinus%20monticola