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The Sudden Oak Death Fourth Science Symposium provided a forum for current research on sudden oak death, caused by the exotic, quarantine pathogen, Phytophthora ramorum. Ninety submissions describing papers or posters on the following sudden oak death/P. ramorum topics are included: biology,…
Author(s): Susan J. Frankel, John T. Kliejunas, Katharine M. Palmieri
Keywords: Sudden oak death, Phytophthora ramorum, invasive species, tanoak, coast live oak
Source: Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-229. Albany, CA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Research Station. 378 p
Year: 2010
Phytophthora ramorum, an introduced invasive plant pathogen that causes sudden oak death, has killed over a million tanoak, coast live oak, Shreve oak, and California black oak trees along the California coastal region from Monterey through Humboldt Counties. Most trees infected with P…
Author(s): C. Lee, Y. Valachovic, M. Garbelotto
Keywords: Sudden oak death, Phytophthora ramorum, treatment
Source: University of California Agriculture and Natural Resources, Publication 8426
Year: 2010
The pathogen, Phytophthora ramorum, causal agent of sudden oak death (SOD) of oaks and tanoaks, continues to expand its range within Oregon despite an effort to eradicate it from native forests. With its early detection and prompt removal of infected hosts, the Oregon SOD eradication…
Author(s): Ebba Peterson, Everett Hansen, Alan Kanaskie
Keywords: Forest pathology, Invasive pathogen, Phytophthora ramorum Restricted randomization, Spatial spread, Sudden oak death
Source: Forest Ecology and Management 312: 216-224
Year: 2014
This publication contains background information and guidance for resource management professionals and landowners to understand and manage sudden oak death (SOD) in California forests. The publication is divided into three chapters: Chapter 1 discusses the epidemiology of SOD in California and…
Author(s): Tedmund J. Swiecki, Elizabeth A. Bernhardt
Keywords: Sudden oak death, Phytophthora ramorum, tree disease management, tanoak, coast live oak, mixed-evergreen forests, invasive species
Source: Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-242. Albany, CA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Research Station. 129 p
Year: 2013
The challenge of observing interactions between plant pathogens, their hosts, and environmental heterogeneity across multiple spatial scales commonly limits our ability to understand and manage wildland forest epidemics. Using the forest pathogen Phytophthora ramorum as a case study, we…
Author(s): W.W. Dillon, S.E. Haas, D.M. Rizzo, R.K. Meentemeyer
Keywords: Host density, landscape epidemiology, multilevel, multiscale, Phytophthora ramorum, Sudden oak death
Source: European Journal of Plant Pathology 138: 449-465
Year: 2014
Numerous 'exotic' tree pathogens are arriving in Europe, North America, and elsewhere due to flaws in current international plant health sanitary and phytosanitary (SPS) protocols. These include lack of protection against the many organisms unknown to science, an emphasis on promoting trade rather…
Author(s): Clive Brasier
Keywords: PSW-GTR-243, Sudden oak death, Phytophthora ramorum, invasive species, tanoak, Notholithocarpus densiflorus, coast live oak, Quercus agrifolia, Japanese larch, Larix kaempferi
Source: In: Frankel, S.J.; Kliejunas, J.T.; Palmieri, K.M.; Alexander, J.M. tech. coords. 2013. Proceedings of the sudden oak death fifth science symposium. Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-243. Albany, CA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Research Station: 1-2
Year: 2013
Sudden oak death (SOD), caused by Phytophthora ramorum, is lethal to tanoak (Notholithocarpus densiflorus (Hook. & Arn.) Manos, Cannon & S.H. Oh), and threatens this species throughout its range in Oregon. The disease was first discovered in coastal southwest Oregon…
Author(s): Gary A. Chastagner, Katie Coats, Marianne Elliott
Keywords: Sudden oak death, Phytophthora ramorum, invasive species, tanoak, Notholithocarpus densiflorus, coast live oak, Quercus agrifolia, Japanese larch, Larix kaempferi
Source: In: Frankel, S.J.; Kliejunas, J.T.; Palmieri, K.M.; Alexander, J.M. tech. coords. Proceedings of the sudden oak death fifth science symposium. Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-243. Albany, CA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Research Station: 14-15.
Year: 2013
Sudden oak death (SOD), caused by Phytophthora ramorum, is lethal to tanoak (Notholithocarpus densiflorus (Hook. & Arn.) Manos, Cannon & S.H. Oh), and threatens this species throughout its range in Oregon. The disease was first discovered in coastal southwest Oregon…
Author(s): Prakash Hebbar, Scott Pfister, Stacy Scott, Anthony Man-Son-Hing, Russ Bulluck
Keywords: Sudden oak death, Phytophthora ramorum, invasive species, tanoak, Notholithocarpus densiflorus, coast live oak, Quercus agrifolia, Japanese larch, Larix kaempferi
Source: In: Frankel, S.J.; Kliejunas, J.T.; Palmieri, K.M.; Alexander, J.M. tech. coords. Proceedings of the sudden oak death fifth science symposium. Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-243. Albany, CA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Research Station: p. 16
Year: 2013
Sudden oak death (SOD), caused by Phytophthora ramorum, is lethal to tanoak (Notholithocarpus densiflorus (Hook. & Arn.) Manos, Cannon & S.H. Oh), and threatens this species throughout its range in Oregon. The disease was first discovered in coastal southwest Oregon…
Author(s): Anna Harris, Joan Webber
Keywords: Sudden oak death, Phytophthora ramorum, invasive species, tanoak, Notholithocarpus densiflorus, coast live oak, Quercus agrifolia, Japanese larch, Larix kaempferi
Source: In: Frankel, S.J.; Kliejunas, J.T.; Palmieri, K.M.; Alexander, J.M. tech. coords. Proceedings of the sudden oak death fifth science symposium. Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-243. Albany, CA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Research Station: p. 17
Year: 2013
Sudden oak death (SOD), caused by Phytophthora ramorum, is lethal to tanoak (Notholithocarpus densiflorus (Hook. & Arn.) Manos, Cannon & S.H. Oh), and threatens this species throughout its range in Oregon. The disease was first discovered in coastal southwest Oregon…
Author(s): Kris Van Poucke, Selma Franceschini, Joan Webber, Kurt Heungens, Clive Brasier
Keywords: Sudden oak death, Phytophthora ramorum, invasive species, tanoak, Notholithocarpus densiflorus, coast live oak, Quercus agrifolia, Japanese larch, Larix kaempferi
Source: In: Frankel, S.J.; Kliejunas, J.T.; Palmieri, K.M.; Alexander, J.M. tech. coords. Proceedings of the sudden oak death fifth science symposium. Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-243. Albany, CA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Research Station: 18-22.
Year: 2013
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