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Researchers and managers have suggested that a narrow range of ground-cover structure resulting from fire might be necessary for suitable Kirtland`s warbler nesting conditions. Yet, Kirtland`s warblers have bred successfully in numerous unburned stands and there is little direct evidence to…
Author(s): John R. Probst, Deahn DonnerWright
Keywords: Kirtland's warbler, habitat suitability, fire ecology, jack pine
Source: Am. Midl. Nat. 149:320?334
Year: 2003
Theoretical models suggest that atmospheric oxygen reached concentrations as high as 35% O2 during the past 550 m.y. Previous burning experiments using strips of paper have challenged this idea, concluding that ancient wildfires would have decimated plant life if O2 significantly exceeded its…
Author(s): Richard A., Jr. Wildman, Leo J. Hickey, Matthew B. Dickinson, Robert A. Berner, Jennifer M. Robinson, Michael Dietrich, Robert H. Essenhigh, Craig B. Wildman
Keywords: Paleozoic, atmospheric oxygen, wildfire, flame spread, fire ecology
Source: Geology 32(5):457-460
Year: 2004
The population of male Kirtland's warbler (Dendroica kirtlandil) in the breeding season has averaged 206 from 1971 to 1987. The Kirtland's warbler occupies dense jack pine (Pinus banksiana) barrens from 5 to 23 years old and from 1.4 to 5.0 m high, formerly of wildfire origin. In 1984, 73% of the…
Author(s): John R. Probst, Jerry Weinrich
Keywords: breeding density, carrying capacity, Dendroica kirtlandii, fire ecology, minimum area requirements, population projections
Source: Landscape Ecology 8(4): 257-271.
Year: 1993
Longleaf pine (Pinus palustris) ecosystems once occupied 38 million ha in the Southeastern United States, occurring as forests, woodlands, and savannas on a variety of sites ranging from wet flatwoods to xeric sandhills and rocky mountainous ridges. Characterized by an open parklike structure,…
Author(s): Dale G. Brockway, Kenneth W. Outcalt, Donald J. Tomczak, Everett E. Johnson
Keywords: Biological diversity, bluestem grasses, disturbance, fire ecology, gopher tortoise, Pinus palustris Mill, red-cockaded woodpecker, wiregrass
Source: Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS-83. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. 34 p.
Year: 2005
Low intensity, spring prescribed burns have been used since 1964 at the Cedar Creek Natural History Area in Minnesota in an attempt to restore the area to an oak savanna. Burned areas are now more savanna like (having greater grass and forb and lower shrub and lower tree representation) than…
Author(s): Alan S. White
Keywords: fire ecology, fire effects, prescribed burning, oak, savanna
Source: Research Paper NC-266. St. Paul, MN: U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service, North Central Forest Experiment Station
Year: 1986
Fire has been a natural component of the aspen ecosystem. Any fire in an established aspen stand will cause injury. Aspen is easily top-killed, but the roots remain viable. A fire's heat can stimulate sprout growth from these roots, aiding natural regeneration.
Author(s): Cary Rouse
Keywords: fire ecology, fire management, silviculture
Source: General Technical Report NC-101. St. Paul, MN: U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service, North Central Forest Experiment Station
Year: 1986
Effects of fire on the oak timber type are reviewed. Many oak stands of today originated under severe fire regimes. Fire can ill or injure oak trees. Factors determining direct injury or mortality from fire include: season of year; bark characteristics; size, vigor and form of tree; fire…
Author(s): Cary Rouse
Keywords: fire ecology, fire management, silviculture, oak
Source: General Technical Report NC-105. St. Paul, MN: U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service, North Central Forest Experiment Station
Year: 1986
The jack pine ecosystem has evolved through fire. Jack pine, although easily killed by fire, has developed serotinous cones that depend upon high heat to open and release the seeds. Without a fire to enable the cones to open, jack pine would be replaced by another species. Prescribed fire can be…
Author(s): Cary Rouse
Keywords: Pinus banksiana, jack pine, fire ecology, silviculture
Source: General Technical Report NC-106. St. Paul, MN: U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service, North Central Forest Experiment Station
Year: 1986
Plant community development was observed for 10 years after a fire had top-killed most trees in a southeastern Missouri oak-hickory forest stand. The forest was re-established by sprouts. Production of herbaceous plants and other potential wildlife food was abundant for 4 years before decreasing…
Author(s): Robert M. Loomis
Keywords: plant succession, forest fire effects, wildlife food production, fire ecology
Source: Research Note NC-219. St. Paul, MN: U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service, North Central Forest Experiment Station
Year: 1977
We describe the distinguishing physical characteristics of old ponderosa pine trees in the Front Range of Colorado, the processes that tend to preserve them, their past and present ecological significance, and their role in ecosystem restoration. Photographs illustrate identifying features of old…
Author(s): Laurie Stroh Huckaby, Merrill R. Kaufmann, Paula J. Fornwalt, Jason M. Stoker, Chuck Dennis
Keywords: Colorado Front Range, ponderosa pine, old growth, fire ecology
Source: Gen. Tech. Rep. RMRS-GTR-110. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. 47 p.
Year: 2003
https://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/search/query?f%5B0%5D=publication_keywords%3Afire%20ecology