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This manual documents procedures for estimating the rate of forward spread, intensity, flame length, and size of fires burning in forests and rangelands. Contains instructions for obtaining fuel and weather data, calculating fire behavior, and interpreting the results for application to actual fire…
Author(s): Richard C. Rothermel
Keywords: fire behavior prediction, fire spread, fire intensity, fire growth
Source: Gen. Tech. Rep. INT-143. Ogden, UT: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Intermountain Forest and Range Experiment Station. 161 p.
Year: 1983
Daily fire growth maps display the growth of the 1988 fires in the Greater Yellowstone Area. Information and data sources included daily infrared photography flights, satellite imagery, ground and aerial reconnaissance, command center intelligence, and the personal recollections of fire behavior…
Author(s): Richard C. Rothermel, Roberta A Hartford, Carolyn H. Chase
Keywords: forest fires, fire growth, geographic information systems, Yellowstone National Park, fire mapping
Source: Gen. Tech. Rep. INT-304. Ogden, UT: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Intermountain Research Station. 64 p.
Year: 1994
Fire managers are required to evaluate and justify the effectiveness of planned fuel treatments in modifying fire growth, behavior and effects on resources and assets. With the number of models currently available, today’s fire manager can become overwhelmed when deciding which model to use. Each…
Author(s): Charles W. McHugh
Keywords: fire, fire ecology, fuels management, fuel treatments analysis, spatial models, fire growth, fire behavior, fire effects
Source: In: Andrews, Patricia L.; Butler, Bret W., comps. 2006. Fuels Management-How to Measure Success: Conference Proceedings. 28-30 March 2006; Portland, OR. Proceedings RMRS-P-41. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 81-105
Year: 2006
Modeling and experiments have suggested that spatial fuel treatment patterns can influence the movement of large fires. On simple theoretical landscapes consisting of two fuel types (treated and untreated) optimal patterns can be analytically derived that disrupt fire growth efficiently (i.e. with…
Author(s): Mark A. Finney
Keywords: fire, fire ecology, fuels management, computational method, fuel treatment units, spatial input data, fire spread, fire growth
Source: In: Andrews, Patricia L.; Butler, Bret W., comps. 2006. Fuels Management-How to Measure Success: Conference Proceedings. 28-30 March 2006; Portland, OR. Proceedings RMRS-P-41. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 107-123
Year: 2006
The Butte City Fire occurred on July 1, 1994, west of Idaho Falls, ID. Ignited from a burning flat tire, the blaze was driven by high winds that caused it to cover over 20,500 acres in just over 6.5 hours. Sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata ssp. wyomingensis) is the principal shrub species…
Author(s): Bret W. Butler, Timothy D. Reynolds
Keywords: wildland fires, rangeland fires, fire behavior, fire growth, fire effects
Source: Gen. Tech. Rep. INT-GTR-351. Ogden, UT: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Intermountain Research Station. 15 p.
Year: 1997
Research Highlights: Our results suggest that weather is a primary driver of resource orders over the course of extended attack efforts on large fires. Incident Management Teams (IMTs) synthesize information about weather, fuels, and order resources based on expected fire growth rather…
Author(s): Jude Bayham, Erin J. Belval, Matthew P. Thompson, Christopher Dunn, Crystal S. Stonesifer, David E. Calkin
Keywords: resource ordering, weather, risk, evacuation, fire growth, incident management teams
Source: Forests. 11: 169.
Year: 2020
https://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/search/query?f%5B0%5D=publication_keywords%3Afire%20growth