Skip to main content
U.S. flag

An official website of the United States government

5 results found
Fire is often integral to forest ecology and can affect forest disease dynamics. Sudden oak death has spread across a large, fire-prone portion of California, killing large numbers of oaks and tanoaks and infecting most associated woody plants. Building on our earlier study of fire-disease dynamics…
Author(s): Max A. Moritz, Dennis C. Odion
Keywords: spatial pattern analysis, landscape pathology, fire management, forest disease epidemiology
Source: In: Frankel, Susan J.; Shea, Patrick J.; and Haverty, Michael I., tech. coords. 2006. Proceedings of the sudden oak death second science symposium: the state of our knowledge. Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-196. Albany, CA: Pacific Southwest Research Station, Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture: 169-177
Year: 2006
As the emergence of invasive pathogens and their impacts on ecological communities increases, so has the interest in understanding how landscape pattern (in other words the configuration and composition of suitable habitat) affects their establishment and spread. Plant pathogen invasions are…
Author(s): Emiko T. Condeso, Ross K. Meentemeyer
Keywords: Scale, landscape pathology, connectivity, fragmentation
Source: In: Frankel, Susan J.; Kliejunas, John T.; Palmieri, Katharine M., tech. coords. 2008. Proceedings of the sudden oak death third science symposium. Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-214. Albany, CA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Research Station. pp. 221-222
Year: 2008
Human land-use practices have resulted in dramatic alterations of forest ecosystems worldwide. By modifying transmission pathways and habitat structure, land use changes are being increasingly implicated in the emergence of infectious plant disease. In this research, we examined the effects of…
Author(s): Ross K. Meentemeyer, Nathan E. Rank, Brian L. Anacker, David M. Rizzo, Hall J. Cushman
Keywords: Phytophthora ramorum, invasive species, landscape pathology, woodland expansion, land-cover change
Source: In: Frankel, Susan J.; Kliejunas, John T.; Palmieri, Katharine M., tech. coords. 2008. Proceedings of the sudden oak death third science symposium. Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-214. Albany, CA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Research Station. pp. 223-224
Year: 2008
Since the first finding of Phytophthora ramorum in the U.K. (on Viburnum tinus, 2002), the pathogen has been reported throughout the country on a variety of susceptible species both in the horticultural sector and in woodlands and historic gardens. The nursery network may have properties which…
Author(s): Marco Pautasso, Tom Harwood, Mike Shaw, Xiangming Xu, Mike Jeger
Keywords: Horticultural trade, landscape pathology, networks epidemiology
Source: In: Frankel, Susan J.; Kliejunas, John T.; Palmieri, Katharine M., tech. coords. 2008. Proceedings of the sudden oak death third science symposium. Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-214. Albany, CA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Research Station. pp. 257-264
Year: 2008
The exotic annual grass Bromus tectorum (cheatgrass) dominates vast acreages of rangeland in the western USA, leading to increased fire frequency and ecosystem degradation that is often irreversible. Episodic regeneration failure (“die-off”) has been observed in cheatgrass monocultures and can have…
Author(s): Peter J. Weisberg, Thomas E. Dilts, Owen W. Baughman, Susan E. Meyer, Elizabeth A. Leger, K. Jane Van Gunst, Lauren Cleeves
Keywords: remote sensing, seed pathogens, invasive plants, Great Basin, cheatgrass, landscape pathology
Source: Ecological Indicators. 79: 173-181.
Year: 2017
https://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/search/query?f%5B0%5D=publication_keywords%3Alandscape%20pathology