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Information is needed on the great gray owl to understand its ecology and to consider this species in land management decisions. From 1982 to 1988, we studied 24 pairs and 107 juvenile great gray owls in northeastern Oregon. Forty-nine nests were located; 16 were used more than once, so we observed…
Author(s): Evelyn L. Bull, Mark G. Henjum
Keywords: Owl, great gray owl, management, conifer forest, Oregon
Source: Gen. Tech. Rep. PNW-GTR-265. Portland, OR: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Research Station. 39 p
Year: 1990
The Tertiary period, from 2.5 to 65 million years ago, was the time oforigin of the modern Sierra Nevada landscape. Climates, geology,and vegetation changed drastically in the Sierra Nevada during thistime, and analyses of this period provide both context for and insightinto vegetation dynamics of…
Author(s): C. I. Millar
Keywords: management, tertiary period, vegetation
Source: Sierra Nevada Ecosystem Project, Final report to Congress, Volume II, Assessments and Scientific Basis for Management Options, Centers for water and Wildland Resources, Report No. 37, University of California, Davis California
Year: 1996
The Sierra Nevada Ecosystem Project (SNEP) case-study assessmentof the Mammoth-June Ecosystem Management Project(MJEMP) was undertaken to review and analyze the efficacy of alocal landscape analysis in achieving ecosystem-management objectivesin the Sierra Nevada. Of primary interest to SNEP was…
Author(s): Connie Millar
Keywords: SNEP, MJEMP, ecological sustainability, management
Source: Sierra Nevada Ecosystem Project, Final Report to Congress, Volume II, Assessments and Scientific Basis for Management Options, Centers for Water and Wildland Resources, Report No. 37, University of California, Davis, California
Year: 1996
This paper provides an overview of the Wilderness science in a time of change conference-Volume 4: Wilderness visitors, experiences, and visitor management. Wilderness areas are managed to protect their wilderness character, but they also provide opportunities for recreation use. Decades ago,…
Author(s): David N. Cole, Stephen F. McCool
Keywords: wilderness, visitors, management
Source: In: Cole, David N.; McCool, Stephen F.; Borrie, William T.; O’Loughlin, Jennifer, comps. 2000. Wilderness science in a time of change conference—Volume 4: Wilderness visitors, experiences, and visitor management; 1999 May 23–27; Missoula, MT. Proceedings RMRS-P-15-VOL-4. Ogden, UT: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 1-2
Year: 2000
Results of research in Shenandoah National Park Wilderness on the differences between day and overnight visitors to the park’s wilderness showed that the two user groups are not as different as originally thought. While the two groups differed somewhat in their level of support for traditional…
Author(s): Meghan K. Papenfuse, Joseph W. Roggenbuck, Troy E. Hall
Keywords: wilderness, visitors, values, expectations, preferences, outdoor recreation, management, Shenandoah National Park Wilderness, Virginia
Source: In: Cole, David N.; McCool, Stephen F.; Borrie, William T.; O’Loughlin, Jennifer, comps. 2000. Wilderness science in a time of change conference—Volume 4: Wilderness visitors, experiences, and visitor management; 1999 May 23–27; Missoula, MT. Proceedings RMRS-P-15-VOL-4. Ogden, UT: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 148-154
Year: 2000
The visual survey methodology of Manning and others (1996) was used to measure visitor response to the number of other floaters encountered on the Niobrara River within the Fort Niobrara Wilderness in Nebraska. An optical scanner and photo-editing software were used to produce 12 composite…
Author(s): John B. Davis, Mark Lindvall
Keywords: wilderness, river recreation, carrying capacity, crowding, satisfaction, management, Fort Niobrara Wilderness, Niobrara River, Nebraska
Source: In: Cole, David N.; McCool, Stephen F.; Borrie, William T.; O’Loughlin, Jennifer, comps. 2000. Wilderness science in a time of change conference—Volume 4: Wilderness visitors, experiences, and visitor management; 1999 May 23–27; Missoula, MT. Proceedings RMRS-P-15-VOL-4. Ogden, UT: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 232-235
Year: 2000
Wilderness managers are forced to make increasingly difficult decisions about where to focus limited resources. Traditionally, areas of high visitor use and high impact are prioritized over areas of light use and light impact. However, areas that contain little to no human impact and contain the…
Author(s): Linda Merigliano, Bryan Smith
Keywords: wilderness, impacts, maps, management, Gros Ventre Wilderness, Wyoming
Source: In: Cole, David N.; McCool, Stephen F.; Borrie, William T.; O’Loughlin, Jennifer, comps. 2000. Wilderness science in a time of change conference—Volume 4: Wilderness visitors, experiences, and visitor management; 1999 May 23–27; Missoula, MT. Proceedings RMRS-P-15-VOL-4. Ogden, UT: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 236-242
Year: 2000
The purpose of this paper is to foster discussion on the basic issue of whether it is appropriate or not to intervene in designated wilderness areas that have been “trammeled by man” and, as a result, no longer retain their “primeval character and influence.” We explore this wilderness management…
Author(s): Charisse A. Sydoriak, Craig D. Allen, Brian F. Jacobs
Keywords: wilderness, management, restoration, piñon-juniper woodlands, Bandelier National Monument, New Mexico
Source: In: Cole, David N.; McCool, Stephen F.; Borrie, William T.; O’Loughlin, Jennifer, comps. 2000. Wilderness science in a time of change conference-Volume 5: Wilderness ecosystems, threats, and management; 1999 May 23–27; Missoula, MT. Proceedings RMRS-P-15-VOL-5. Ogden, UT: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 209-215
Year: 2000
The Federal Wildland Fire Management Policy and Program Review represents the latest stage in the evolution of wildland fire management. This policy directs changes that consolidate past fire management practices into a single direction to achieve multidimensional objectives and creates increased…
Author(s): G. Thomas Zimmerman, David L. Bunnell
Keywords: wilderness, fire, policy, management
Source: In: Cole, David N.; McCool, Stephen F.; Borrie, William T.; O’Loughlin, Jennifer, comps. 2000. Wilderness science in a time of change conference-Volume 5: Wilderness ecosystems, threats, and management; 1999 May 23–27; Missoula, MT. Proceedings RMRS-P-15-VOL-5. Ogden, UT: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 288-297
Year: 2000
In March and April of 2003, over 250 managers, researchers, and other participants gathered for a series of workshops at Oregon State University, the University of Arizona, and Colorado State University, near the largest wildfires of 2002. In response to the need for better understanding of large…
Author(s): Seth M. White
Keywords: Wildfire, fire, communication, technology transfer, applied research, management, information, partnerships
Source: Gen. Tech. Rep. PNW-GTR-599. Portland, OR: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Research Station. 41 p
Year: 2004
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