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Prescribed burning in midspring may stimulate height growth of longleaf pine seedlings. Seedlings were planted on sandy and clayey sites that were prescribed burned 2 years later. Treatments were cool, moderate, and hot burns and an unburned control. The hot, May burn significantly increased…
Author(s): William R. Maple
Keywords: Pinus palustris Mill, brown-spot needle blight, Scirrhia acicola, planting
Source: Res. Note SO-228. New Orleans, LA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Forest Experiment Station. 2 p.
Year: 1977
The efficiency of a precision seeder was improved by adding a mirror so employees could monitor seed levels and by marking seeds with brightly colored talc to quickly verify the accuracy of the machine.
Author(s): R. Kasten Dumroese, David L. Wenny, Susan J. Morrison
Keywords: Old Mill Seeder, planting, mirror, sowing machine, talc, seeds
Source: Native Plants Journal, Vol. 3 No. 2 Fall 2002, p. 140-141
Year: 2002
Of six species interplanted in oak clearcuttings, sugar maple, red maple, and white ash were the most successful. Other species planted were northern red oak, yellow-poplar, and American basswood. Gives numbers of trees that should be planted for each species and initial size of planting stock.
Author(s): Paul S. Johnson
Keywords: regeneration, planting, white ash, yellow-poplar, northern red oak
Source: Research Paper NC-126. St. Paul, MN: U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service, North Central Forest Experiment Station
Year: 1976
Equations for estimating project costs for certain silvicultural treatments in the Lake States have been developed from project records of public forests. Treatments include machine site preparation, hand planting, aerial spraying, prescribed burning, manual release, and thinning.
Author(s): Jeffrey T. Olson, Allen L. Lundgren, Dietmar Rose
Keywords: cost equations, site preparation, planting, prescribed burning, release, thinning
Source: Research Paper NC-163. St. Paul, MN: U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service, North Central Forest Experiment Station
Year: 1978
Container size and shape, potting medium, and genotype interacted to influence the growth of black walnut (Juglans nigra L.) seedlings. Larger containers tended to produce larger trees. In tall, narrow, vent-pipe containers, different, proportions of peat and sand in potting media had no effect…
Author(s): David T. Funk, Paul L Roth, C. K. Celmer
Keywords: Juglans nigra, peat, sand, genotype, planting
Source: Research Note NC-253. St. Paul, MN: U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service, North Central Forest Experiment Station
Year: 1980
After seven growing seasons, survival of black walnut seedlings planted in cleared forest openings did not differ by competition control treatments. The trees grew somewhat larger where all competing vegetation was controlled but almost as large where only herbaceous competition was controlled.…
Author(s): John E. Krajicek
Keywords: Julans nigra, weed control, planting, herbicides
Source: Research Note NC-192. St. Paul, MN: U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service, North Central Forest Experiment Station
Year: 1975
Shelterwood-strip harvesting in a mature red pine stand provided favorable growing conditions for red pine seedlings established by planting nursery stock, by planting 10-week-old to 1-year-old tubelings, and by direct seeding. How long the shelterwood-strips can be left standing before they…
Author(s): John W. Benzie, Alvin A. Alm
Keywords: regeneration, planting, seeding, tubelings, visual quality
Source: Research Note NC-224. St. Paul, MN: U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service, North Central Forest Experiment Station
Year: 1977
Aspen suckers from 1-m-long root cuttings survived and grew better than those from 12.5-cm-long cuttings. Sucker survival and growth were also inversely related to parent root diameter. Discusses the practical implications for aspen management.
Author(s): Donald A. Perala
Keywords: Populus tremuloides, regeneration, propagation, planting, site-preparation
Source: Research Note NC-241. St. Paul, MN: U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service, North Central Forest Experiment Station
Year: 1978
Grand Fir Mosaic habitats are difficult to regenerate because of pocket gophers (Thomomys talpoides) and successional plant communities dominated by bracken fern (Pteridium aquilinum) and western coneflower (Rudbeckia occidentalis). This study tested reforestation practices recommended by previous…
Author(s): Dennis E. Ferguson, John C. Byrne, Dale O. Coffen
Keywords: planting, Pteridium aquilinum, bracken fern, Rudbeckia occidentalis, western coneflower, Thomomys talpoides, pocket gophers
Source: Res. Pap. RMRS-RP-53. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. 16 p.
Year: 2005
Results of the first three years of revegetation research on closed wilderness campsites are described. Experimental treatments involved soil scarification, an organic soil amendment (a mix of locally collected organic materials and peat moss and an inoculation of native undisturbed soil), an…
Author(s): David N. Cole, David R. Spildie
Keywords: wilderness, campsites, soil amendments, planting, revegetation, mulch, seeding, transplanting, Eagle Cap Wilderness, Oregon
Source: In: Cole, David N.; McCool, Stephen F.; Borrie, William T.; O’Loughlin, Jennifer, comps. 2000. Wilderness science in a time of change conference-Volume 5: Wilderness ecosystems, threats, and management; 1999 May 23–27; Missoula, MT. Proceedings RMRS-P-15-VOL-5. Ogden, UT: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 181-187
Year: 2000
https://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/search/query?f%5B0%5D=publication_keywords%3Aplanting