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2,737 results found
Western hemlock (Tsuga heterophylla) can be characterized by localized regions of high-moisture-content wood, often referred to as wet pockets, and uneven drying conditions may occur when lumber of higher and lower moisture content is mixed together in a dry kiln. The primary objective of…
Author(s): David L. Nicholls, Allen M. Brackley, Travis Allen
Keywords: Western hemlock, Tsuga heterophylla, lumber, drying, sawmill, moisture content, Alaska
Source: Res. Note PNW-RN-530. Portland, OR: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Research Station. 8 p
Year: 2003
Comandra blister rust is a damaging canker disease of lodgepole pine in the Central Rocky Mountains. Our knowledge of previous blister rust outbreaks and the effects of weather and climate on rust epidemiology has not been sufficient to explain the frequency and severity of disease outbreaks. Thus…
Author(s): William R. Jacobi, Brian W. Geils, Jane E. Taylor
Keywords: climate, weather, meteorology, risk rating, spore dispersal
Source: Res. Pap. RMRS-RP-36. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. 13 p.
Year: 2002
1. We examined how rapidly soils can change during secondary succession by observing soil development on 350-year chronosequences in three pristine forest ecosystems in south-east Alaska. 2. Soil surfaces, created by different windthrow events of known or estimated age, were examined within each of…
Author(s): B.T. Bormann, H. Spaltenstein, M.H. McClellan, F.C. Ugolini, K. Cromack, S.M. Nay
Keywords: C accumulation, chronosequence, disturbance frequency, podzolization, soil development, soil disturbance, windthrow
Source: Journal of Ecology. 83: 747 - 757
Year: 1995
Natural ponderosa pine fuels can be safely burned with air temperatures between 55° and 75°
Author(s): Michael G. Harrington
Keywords: fuel reduction, hazard reduction, burning prescription, Pinus ponderosa var. arizonica
Source: Res. Note RM-RN-402. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Forest and Range Experiment Station. 7 p.
Year: 1981
Arizona's natural ponderosa pine stands are characterized by open, mature groups and adjacent closed, dense thickets. The open structure of the mature groups permits a warm, dry environment, resulting in very low fuel moisture during much of the fire season and creating high ignition and fire…
Author(s): Michael G. Harrington
Keywords: fuel loadings, stand characteristics, fire behavior potential, Pinus ponderosa var. arizonica
Source: Res. Note RM-RN-418. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Forest and Range Experiment Station. 6 p.
Year: 1982
In making choices about how to manage the country’s wealth of forest land, stakeholders including U.S. taxpayers—have many choices, all of them with ripple effects that extend far beyond the immediate stands of trees. In the Pacific Northwest, as elsewhere, biophysical, ecological, and…
Author(s): Sally Duncan
Source: Science Findings 55. Portland, OR: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Research Station. 5 p
Year: 2003
Fifteen years of research on old-growth and managed coniferous forests have provided sufficient understanding of biodiversity to suggest a basis for ecosystem management. First, natural old forests have a metaphysics values associated with their existence and function can never be addressed fully…
Author(s): Andrew B. Carey
Source: Northwest Science. 72(2): 127-133.
Year: 1998
Understanding ecological processes and their spatial scales is key to managing ecosystems for biodiversity, especially for species associated with late-seral forest. We focused on 2 species of squirrel (Sciuridae: northern flying squirrel, Glaucomys sabrinus, and Townsend's chipmunk, Tamias…
Author(s): A.B. Carey, J. Kershner, B. Biswell, L.S. Dominguez de Toledo
Keywords: ecological scale, forest development, Glaucomys sabrinus, habitat, northern flying squirrel, Oregon, Tamias townsendii, Townsend's chipmunk
Source: Wildlife Monographs. 142: 1-71
Year: 1999
Of the 15 species of bats in the Pacific Northwest, 11 are known to make regular use of the forest canopy for roosting, foraging, and reproduction. This paper reviews roosting requirements, foraging, and the importance of landscape-scale factors to canopy using species in the Northwest. Many…
Author(s): L. Wunder, A.B. Carey
Source: Northwest Science. 68(2): 159
Year: 1994
Public lands in the US Rocky Mountains provide critical ecosystem services, especially to rural communities that rely on these lands for fuel, food, water, and recreation. Climate change will likely affect the ability of these lands to provide ecosystem services. We describe 2 efforts to assess…
Author(s): Jessica E. Halofsky, Travis W. Warziniack, David L. Peterson, Joanne J. Ho
Keywords: adaptation, ecosystem management, mountain ecosystems, vulnerability assessment, USA, Sustainable Development Goals, Agenda 2030
Source: Mountain Research and Development. 37(3): 340-352.
Year: 2017
https://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/search/query?keywords=%22Urban%20ecosystem%20services%22&f%5B0%5D=national_research_taxonomy%3A91