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3,637 results found
Genetic resource management has historically called for altering the genetic structure of plant populations through selection for traits of interest such as rapid growth. Although this is still a principal component of tree breeding programs in the Pacific Northwest, managing genetic resources now…
Author(s): Sally Duncan
Source: Science Findings. Portland, OR: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Research Station. April (52): 1-5
Year: 2003
Integrating management actions to consistently achieve broad ecological and socioeconomic goals is a challenge largely unmet. The presumed or real conflict between these goals establishes a forum for debate. Broad measures are needed to describe tradeoffs, trends in conditions under varying…
Author(s): Richard W. Haynes, Thomas M. Quigley
Keywords: land management, Columbia basin, tradeoffs, resource conditions
Source: Forest Ecology and Management. 153: 179-188
Year: 2001
We compared two methods of detecting presence of swift fox: smoked-plate scent stations and spotlight counts. Tracks were counted on ten 1-mile (1.6-km) transects with bait/tracking plate stations every 0.1 mile (0.16 km). Vehicle spotlight counts were conducted on the same transects. Methods were…
Author(s): Daniel W. Uresk, Kieth E. Severson, Jody Javersak
Keywords: swift fox, Vulpes velox, monitoring techniques, track counts, spotlight counts, smoked plates, South Dakota
Source: Res. Pap. RMRS-RP-39. Ogden, UT: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. 5 p.
Year: 2003
Rangelands comprise about 42 percent of the land area of the United States and provide vital land functions such as watershed, multiple-use, recreation, and other amenities. Currently, we do not know the status and trends of many of our nation's rangelands, and consistent protocols for describing…
Author(s): Renee A. O'Brien, Curtis M. Johnson, Andrea M. Wilson, Van C. Elsbernd
Keywords: rangeland health, functionality, indicators, bare ground, noxious weeds, species composition
Source: Gen. Tech. Rep. RMRS-GTR-104. Ogden, UT: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. 13 p.
Year: 2003
Epiphytic lichen communities are included in the national Forest Health Monitoring (FHM) program because they help us assess resource contamination, biodiversity, and sustainability in the context of forest health. In 1996, field crews collected lichen samples on 141 field plots systematically…
Author(s): Peter Neitlich, Paul Rogers, Roger Rosentreter
Keywords: lichens, Forest Health Monitoring, forest inventory, Idaho, air quality, biodiversity
Source: Gen. Tech. Rep. RMRS-GTR-103. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. 14 p.
Year: 2003
This document provides information on three sampling methods used to inventory and monitor the vegetation resources in riparian areas. The vegetation cross-section method evaluates the health of vegetation across the valley floor. The greenline method provides a measurement of the streamside…
Author(s): Alma H. Winward
Keywords: riparian sampling, vegetation cross-section, greenline, woody regeneration
Source: RMRS-GTR-47. Ogden, UT: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. 49 p.
Year: 2000
More than 100 species of vertebrates in the Pacific Northwest use standing dead trees (snags) at one time or another in their lifecycle (Thomas et al. 1979a, Neitro et al. 1985). With few exceptions, investigators have found significant correlations between snag density and the abundance of primary…
Author(s): Janet L. Ohmann, William C. McComb, Abdel Azim Zumrawi
Keywords: Ecosystem management, managed forests, snags, wildlife habitat, wildlife trees
Source: Wildlife Society Bulletin. 22: 607-620
Year: 1994
In making choices about how to manage the country’s wealth of forest land, stakeholders including U.S. taxpayers—have many choices, all of them with ripple effects that extend far beyond the immediate stands of trees. In the Pacific Northwest, as elsewhere, biophysical, ecological, and…
Author(s): Sally Duncan
Source: Science Findings 55. Portland, OR: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Research Station. 5 p
Year: 2003
Longleaf pine (Pinus palustris Mill.) ecosystems once occupied 90 million acres in the southern United States’ coastal plain. Restoration of longleaf pine ecosystems has been difficult because reestablishment of the species by either natural or artificial means has been problematic. The application…
Author(s): James P. Barnett
Keywords: longleaf pine ecosystems, container seedling technology, reforestation, seed collecting, seedling cultural techniques
Source: In: Shepperd, Wayne D.; Eskew, Lane G., compilers. 2004. Silviculture in special places: Proceedings of the National Silviculture Workshop; 2003 September 8-11; Granby, CO. Proceedings RMRS-P-34. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 127-134
Year: 2004
A pilot watershed analysis along with the Davis Late Successional Reserve analysis in the range of the northern spotted owl identified potential loss of suitable habitat, reduction in the numbers of large trees, and lack of replacements for large trees. A variety of silvicultural thinning…
Author(s): Jim Stone, Joan Kittrell
Keywords: pilot watershed, northern spotted owl, silvicultural thinning techniques
Source: In: Shepperd, Wayne D.; Eskew, Lane G., compilers. 2004. Silviculture in special places: Proceedings of the National Silviculture Workshop; 2003 September 8-11; Granby, CO. Proceedings RMRS-P-34. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 156-163
Year: 2004
https://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/search/query?keywords=%22juniper%22&f%5B0%5D=national_research_taxonomy%3A95