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Your national forests and grasslands are 193 million acres of vast, scenic beauty waiting for you to discover. Visitors who choose to recreate on these public lands find more than 150,000 miles of trails, 10,000 developed recreation sites, 57,000 miles of streams, 122 alpine ski areas, 338,000 heritage sites, and specially designated sites that include 9,100 miles of byways, 22 recreation areas, 11 scenic areas, 439 wilderness areas, 122 wild and scenic rivers, nine monuments, and one preserve. And remember, “It’s All Yours.”

Displaying 1 - 25 of 173

Bluewood Ski Area

Perched high atop the Blue Mountains in southeast Washington, Ski Bluewood occupies the second-highest base elevation in the state (4,450 feet). The Blue Mountains rise out of a high-desert region, which provides clear skies and cold, smoke powder which brings an average annual snowfall of over 300 inches.  Ski Bluewood is known for having some of the best snow in the state as well as memorable tree…

Andies Prairie Sno-Park

So you want to play in the snow! Andies Prairie is the only designated sledding and winter camping area in the Blue Mountains. This sledding area is located in a rock pit which has been shaped to provide sledding runs. Motorized vehicles are not allowed in the sledding or snow camping area from December 1 through April 1.  Your safety is everyone’s concern. It is up to you to make sure you have a safe and…

Wenaha -Tucannon Wilderness

The Wenaha-Tucannon Wilderness was created by the Endangered American Wilderness Act of 1978. This wilderness is located in the northern Blue Mountains of southeastern Washington and northeastern Oregon and encompasses 176,557 acres. The majority of the wilderness is characterized by rugged basaltic ridges and outcroppings separated by deep canyons with steep side slopes. Elevations range from 2,000 feet on the Wild…

Walla Walla Ranger District

The Walla Walla Ranger District stretches from Dayton, WA, to the north to I-84 and Meacham, OR, to the south, Elgin, OR, and the Grande Ronde River to the east and the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation to the west. It includes land in five counties and two states with a broad diversity of natural resources and an equally broad diversity of users.

Vinegar Hill/Indian Rock Scenic Area

This scenic area is located on the southernmost portion of the Umatilla National Forest adjacent to the North Fork John Day Wilderness. It covers over 25,000 acres, including the highest elevation point on the Forest: Vinegar Hill at 8,100 feet. The major attraction of this area, aside from hunting opportunities, is the splendid 360-degree vista available from several high elevation viewpoints. Hiking in grassy,…

Table Rock Lookout

Table Rock offers spectacular and unmatched views of the surrounding terrain. To the west is the Mill Creek Watershed, municipal water source for the City of Walla Walla, Washington, and eastward lies the Wenaha-Tucannon Wilderness. On the narrow ridgeline separating these two rugged areas is the Kendall Skyline Road (Forest Service Road 64).

Sturdevant Springs

This site offers groomed cross-country ski trails.

North Fork Umatilla Wilderness

The North Fork Umatilla Wilderness, located 30 miles east of Pendleton, is the smallest wilderness in northeast Oregon. It encompasses only 20,299 acres in Umatilla and Union counties. But this little wilderness feels much bigger for those who take the time to trek into the heart of the area and fully experience its variety of terrain and vegetation. Visitors find the area peaceful, yet challenging and enjoyable…

North Fork John Day Wilderness: Umatilla

From rolling benchlands to the granite outcrops of the Greenhorn Mountains, the rugged North Fork John Day Wilderness provides an abundance of natural diversity. The wilderness is known primarily for its big game (Rocky Mountain elk and mule deer) and its anadromous fish habitat. There are over 130 miles of perennial streams, 40 miles of which provide spawning habitat for Chinook salmon and steelhead. The wilderness…

Meacham Divide/Mt. Emily Sno-Park

Located in northeast Oregon at an elevation of 4200’ this is Oregon’s second largest Nordic area.  The trail system is over 20 km long and is comprised of eight trails, starting with the Loppet Trail, which has the Roller Coaster, Kansas, Butcher, Tillicum, and Quarry Loops branching from it.  Loppet Trail starts at the parking area and ends at Loppet Point (11 km round trip).  The first 2.5…

Blue Mountain Scenic Byway

The Blue Mountain Scenic Byway, designated in 1989 under the National Scenic Byway Program, allows east-west travelers an alternative route between the Columbia River near Arlington and Baker City, Oregon. This scenic byway covers 130 miles of paved, two-lane road, crossing Morrow and…

Wickiup Campground

Located near the Triple Ridge area surrounded by The Jones, Huckleberry, and Hogback ridges; Wickiup Campground offers great hiking opportunities (within five miles), hunting, and views. Cold water springs are available 100 yards below the campground and fishing can be found at Ranger Creek (within 5 miles).

Wenatchee Trailhead

Provides access to: Wenatchee Trail #3173. There is plenty of parking area for horse trailers at the trailhead.

Wenatchee Guard Station

  The Wenatchee Guard Station sits on a grassy clearing on a high plateau dotted with mixed conifers, and offers a peaceful view of the northern tip of the Blue Mountains. In the spring, wild flowers, such as Yarrow, Pipers Anemone, Big Leaf Sandwort, Showy Aster, Camas Pink Fairies, Daisies and Peavine, and sagebrush cascade a riot of color down the slopes into V-shaped valleys. The hills are home to herds of…

Twin Buttes Trailhead

Provides access to: Grizzly Bear Trail #3103 and East Butte Trail #3112 that access Wenaha-Tucannon Wilderness. This trailhead offers a parking area, vault toilet,…

Tucannon Trailhead

Provides access to: Tucannon Trail #3135. A portion of this scenic trail enters Wenaha-Tucanoon Wilderness from the Washington side.  There is a small turnaround at the trailhead, so it is not recommended to take horse trailers to the trailhead. There…

Tucannon Guard Station

Spend the day at the charming saltbox-style Tucannon cabin situated on a shady, gently rolling site at the base of a hillside. Pull up a chair on the covered front porch, and enjoy the peace and quiet, while keeping binoculars and a camera handy. A picnic table beneath the trees near the cabin allows for comfortable outdoor dining in the summertime…

Tucannon Campground

Located along the Tucannon River and bordering the Wooten State Wildlife area, the Tucannon Campground has several ponds nearby, managed by the Washington Department of Wildlife. These ponds are stocked with trout, offering excellent fishing opportunities for the entire family. This campground is heavily used from the opening weekend of fishing season, in early spring, through the fall hunting seasons. Tucannon…

Troy Trailhead

Provides access to: Wenaha River Trail #3106 which follows the Wenaha River west into Wenaha - Tucannon Wilderness. This is also a popular access point to meet up with …

Timothy Springs Trailhead

Provides access to: Wenaha River Trail #3106 which is popular hiking trail access to Wenaha-Tucannon Wilderness from the Oregon side. Directions: From Troy, OR take Troy Road south for a .5 mile and then continue on Eden Lane for 2.2 miles. Turn…

Meadow Creek Trailhead

Provides access to: Meadow Creek Trail #3123. Trail #3123 trail begins at Meadow Creek Trailhead and ends on Forest Service Road 4608 and is maintained for ATV, motorbikes, mountain bikes, foot, and horse user groups. The trail follows along Meadow Creek for 3 miles before it climbs in elevation to the Godman area.

Iron Springs Road #42

This trail begins at Iron Springs and ends at Brushy Ridge Junction. It generally follows a gradual climb with some dips from the Forest boundary to Brushy Ridge on the Iron Springs Road. The longest consistent hill climb is from the Big Springs Campground turn off heading toward Brushy Ridge. A map of the area can be found here. 

Ladybug Campground

Along with our welcomed visitors, the ladybugs of the Coccunellidae family, we also welcome you to enjoy these brightly colored insects along with other opportunities this campground has to offer. Being in close proximity of the Wenaha-Tucannon Wilderness, hunting, hiking, and bicycling are a few of the recreational opportunities that are at…

 

https://www.fs.usda.gov/visit/destinations?field_rec_forest_target_id=11958&field_rec_activities_target_id=All